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FSU FAD 2230 - Chapter 1 Family definitions

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Family and Relationships Test 1Chapters 1-5Chapter 11. Family definitionsa. Social Sciencei. A relationship by blood, marriage, or affectionii. Examples – football team, old lady with catb. Legali. 2 or more people living together related by blood, marriage, or adoption2. Other definitionsa. Family of Orientationi. Family you are born intob. Family of Procreationi. Family you make through marriage1. Spouse and childrenc. Fictive kini. Nonrelatives with a strong and intimate bond3. Functions of Familya. Marriagei. Institutional arrangement between two people to publically recognize their social and intimate bondsb. William Stephen’s Definition of Marriagei. A socially legitimate sexual unionii. Is publically announcediii. Undertaken that it will be permanentiv. Assumed that there is more or less an explicit marriage contractc. Functions of Marriagei. Regulation of sexual behavior1. Cultures regulate behavior by creating ideas on who and when can have sexual relationships2. Incest tabooa. Virtually universal regulation that forbids sexual activity and marriage between family membersii. Reproducing and socializing children1. Able to reproduce and continue human race2. Raise children togetheriii. Property and inheritance1. Wealth staying within family2. Land ownershipiv. Economic cooperation1. Sometimes marriage is necessary for families to survive because of economic benefits2. Two spouses can mean two jobsv. Social placement, status, and roles1. Marrying in a family with wealthvi. Care, warmth, protection and intimacy1. Having a family gives you a permanent support system4. Perspectives on familiesa. Microi. Your perspectiveii. Focus on individual and his/her interactionsb. Macroi. Your overall beliefsii. Focus on interconnections of marriage, families, and intimate relationships with the rest of society5. Family as social institutiona. Social institutioni. Major sphere of social life with a set of beliefs and rules that is organized to meet basic human needsii. Families used to encompass many of the other social institutionsthat are present today1. Examples – political, religious, healthcare2. How families acted as sucha. Families working together in the fieldb. Families acting as your hospitalc. Families providing you your educationd. Families teaching you religionb. Statusi. General status it he social position that you occupyii. Master status1. The major defining status of a persona. Most people have more than one statusb. Is your biggest defining factorc. Will change throughout lifetimei. Example – becoming a mother2. Examples – student, child, white, girl6. Unemployment and Marriage Ratesa. Single-parent households with woman in chargei. People believe these women are purposely having children outside of marriage1. Not true – many factors affect circumstancesb. “Why are so many women having children without marrying their children’s fathers?i. Micro-Level Factor1. Poor women seem to value marriage quite highly2. Because they believe their relationship isn’t perfect, won’t marry and shy themselves away from marriageii. Macro-Level Factor1. Women see marriage as too risky as their potential spouseis most likely not too financially stablec. Human Agencyi. Ability of humans to create viable lives, even when they are constrained and limited by many social forcesii. Example – young-single women raising a child on little income7. Marriage patternsa. Monogamyi. Marriage between a male and femaleb. Polygamyi. System allowing for more than one spouseii. Polygyny1. Husband with more than one wifeiii. Polyandry1. Wife with more than one husband8. Authoritya. Patriarchyi. Form of social organization where the norm/expectation is that men have a natural right of authority over womenb. Matriarchyi. Form of social organization where the norm/expectation is that women have a natural right of power over men1. Typically, not seen in many societiesc. Egalitariani. Expectation that power/authority are equally vested in men andwomen9. Patterns of Descenta. Bilaterali. Descent traced through male and female sides1. Example – in United States you have two sets of grandparentsb. Patrilineali. Descent pattern where lineage is traced exclusively/primarily through a man’s familial line1. Example – in United States your last name is most likely from your father’s family linec. Matrilineali. Descent pattern where lineage is traced through wife’s family1. Example – Native American tribes10. Chinese Marriage Policiesa. Couples in China still cannot marry freelyi. Government requires people who plan to marry to apply for permission and register officially on a waiting list1. Fortunately, can choose your mateb. Government has these rules to regulate births due to large populationc. One-Child Policyi. With few exceptions, families are typically only allowed to have one child togetherii. Cannot simply “get pregnant” without facing consequences1. Heavy fines2. Strong encouragement for abortioniii. Benefits1. Can offer their child best of everything; education, attention, more incomeiv. Downfalls1. Higher value on males in societya. Many baby girls have disappeared because to carryon family name, couples want to have a boy11. Residence patternsa. Neolocali. Expectation that a newly marriage couple will establish residenceii. Will live independentlyb. Social expectation on livingi. Patrilocal1. New couple with live with husband’s familyii. Matrilocal1. New couple will live with wife’s family12. History of Family Lifea. Colonial America i. Everything happened within the family; self sufficientii. Example – prison1. No actual facility, people sent to work for a familyiii. Nuclear family 1. Family comprised of adults and their childreniv. Extended family 1. Family compromised of parents, children, and other relatives such as grandparentsa. In colonial America, extended family did not live with you because older adults typically died before their grandchildren were bornv. African American Families 1. Family bond extremely importanta. Relationships created by “blood” were considered more important than those of marriage to African Americans2. Importation of Slaves Stoppeda. Whites began to encourage family relationships and childbearing among African American Slavesb. Some relationships forced for “breeding” purposesb. Industrialization, Urbanization, and Immigration i. Families leaving home to go to work in the cityii. Helped define adolescence period1.


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