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FSU FAD 2230 - CHAPTER 11

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CHAPTER 11Intimate partner violence• Defined as violence between those who are physically and sexually intimate, such as spouses or partners.o Can encompass physical, economic, sexual, or psychological abuse• Domestic abuse is against seniors, children, basically everyone—different from IPVHow we define and measure intimate partner violence• Conflict tactics scale: a scale based on how people deal with disagreements in relationshipso Are men or women more likely to b victims? Bias and the CTSFrequency of intimate partner violence• Femicide: the killing of womenTypes of IPV• Common couple violence• Intimate terrorism• Violent resistance• Mutual violent control• Stalking and cyperstalkingJust understand that there are differences, not just what she encounteredCopings with Violence: leaving and staying• Learned helplessness: the psychological condition of having low self-esteem, feeling helpless, and having no control that is caused by repeated abuse• Battered women’s syndrome: a recognized psychological condition, often a subcategory of post-traumatic stress syndrome, used to describe someone who has been the victim of consistent and/or severe domestic violenceViolence in gay and lesbian relationshipsDating violenceRape and sexual assault• Rape on college campuses• “Date Rape” Drugs: drugs that are used to immobilize a person to facilitate an assaultThe most common types of child abuse:1. neglect 71%2. physical abuse 16%3. sexual abuse 9%4. other 9%5. psychological maltreatment 7%6. medical neglect 2%7. unknown or missing 0%• Child Abuse: at attack on a child that results in an injury and violates our social norms• Types of child abuse• Corporal Punishment• Who Would Abuse Children?Consequence of Child AbuseTrafficking• The recruitment, transportation, transfer, harboring, or receipt of persons by means of threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction…Explanations for violence among intimatesMicro level explanations• The intergenerational transmission of violence: a cycle of violence that is passed down to dependents• Stress explanationsMacro-level explanations• Patriarchy• Cultural norms support violenceViolence and the lawDomestic violence sheltersDefined as a temporary safe house for a woman (with or without children) who is escaping an abusive relationshipThe treatment programs for abusersCHAPTER 12: THE PROCESS OF DIVORCEHow Common Is divorce? It depends on how we measure it• Crude divorce rate: the number of divorces per 1,000 people in the population• Redefined divorce rate: a measure of divorce based on the number of divorces that occur out of every 1,000 married womenHistorical trends• If you come from a divorced family, you’re more likely to divorce…NOT always trueWhy do people divorce?• Macro-structural factors• Level of socioeconomic development• Religion• Divorce lawso No-fault Divorce: a type of divorce, now prevalent in all fifty states in which a divorcing couple can go before a judge without one party having to blame the otherThe phases of separation1. honeymoon2. Erosion3. high conflict4. apathy5. separation• Legal separation: a binding agreement signed by both spouses that provides detail about child supportThe stations of divorce• Defined as he interrelated emotional, legal, economic, co-parental, community, and psychic dimensions of divorce, which together attempt to capture the complexity of the divorce experience• The emotional divorce• Legal divorceo The termination of the marriage contract by a state court order• Economic divorceo Alimony: payment by one partner to the other to support the more depends spouse for a period of time.o In Florida you need to be married around typically 11 years in order to get alimony• Co-Parental divorceo Legal custody: a custody agreement where one parent has the legal authority to make important decisions concerning the children after a divorceo Child snatching: the act of a noncustodial parent kidnapping his or her child• The psychic divorce: when they stop looking back and begin to look forward• A helping hand: divorce mediationo Divorce mediation: a non-adversarial means of resolution, in which the divorcing couple, along with a third party, such as a therapist or trained mediator, negotiate the terms of the financial, custody, and visitation settlement.• Child support order: a legal document delineating the amount and circumstances surrounding the financial support of noncustodial childrenWhat are the effects of divorce on children?Long-term effects• Age and sex of the child• A word of cautionShort-Term Effects• Parental conflict• Loss of a parent• A reduced standard of living• Adjusting to transitions“Why would I be happier?”• Previously- unhappy married couples who did not divorce and who turned their marriages around fell into three broad typeso The martial endurance ethico The martial work ethic—marriage is not easy, it takes worko The personal happiness ethic• Covenant Marriage• Binuclear family- a type of family consisting of divorced parents living in two separate households but remaining one family in spirit for the sake of the children.CHAPTER 13 FAMILY LIVE, PARTNERING, AND REMARRIAGE AFTER DIVORCEBeing single again• the emotional effects of divorce• relationships between custodial parents and children• issues for custodial mothers: downward mobility• custodial fathers: a growing group• repartnering: the act of entering into a relationship after a divorce, which may lead to cohabitation or marriageo what leads people to marry instead of cohabitating is because they get pregnantRemarriagePower and equity between spousesSatisfaction and stability of remarriagesStep Families• blended family (reconstituted family): another term for step family; a family that may consist of stepparents, stepsiblings, or half-siblings• siblings: children who share both biological parents• stepsiblings: children not biologically related but whose parents are married to one another• half-sibling: a child who shares one biological parent with another child.• Mutual child(ren): the child or children born to a couple that has remarried• Residential step child(ren): a child or children living in the household with a remarried couple more than half of the time.Stereotypes of stepfamilies: the wicked stepmotherMultiple relationships and dynamics• Former spouse subsystem•


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