Berkeley ELENG 105 - Lecture 17 (15 pages)

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Lecture 17



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Lecture 17

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Pages:
15
School:
University of California, Berkeley
Course:
Eleng 105 - Microelectronic Devices and Circuits
Microelectronic Devices and Circuits Documents

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EECS 105 Spring 2002 Lecture 17 R T Howe Lecture 17 Last time Wrap up two port MOS amplifiers Today Sinusoidal signals Phasor representation of sinusoids Dept of EECS University of California Berkeley EECS 105 Spring 2002 Lecture 17 R T Howe Sinusoidal Function Review v t v cos t amplitude half of peak to peak Dept of EECS phase degrees or radians frequency radian 2 f 2 1 T University of California Berkeley EECS 105 Spring 2002 Lecture 17 R T Howe Graphical Description v 1 t v cos t v2 t v cos t 45 2 T Dept of EECS T University of California Berkeley EECS 105 Spring 2002 Lecture 17 R T Howe Why are Sinusoids Important Any periodic signal v t can be expressed as a sum of sinusoidal signals by a Fourier series expansion EECS 20N EE 120 The response of a linear circuit to a sinusoidal input as a function of its frequency leads to insights into the behavior of the circuit Dept of EECS University of California Berkeley EECS 105 Spring 2002 Lecture 17 R T Howe Linear Circuits Theorem solutions for voltages and currents in a linear circuit i e one consisting of R L C and dependent sources Gm Rm Av and Ai with a sinusoidal signal as the input are Dept of EECS University of California Berkeley EECS 105 Spring 2002 Lecture 17 R T Howe RC Circuit with Sinusoidal Input iR vs t vc t R iC C vs t Vs cos t set phase of source to zero use as the reference vc t Vc cos t solution is a sinusoidal signal with the same frequency but with a different amplitude and phase shifted with respect to the source Dept of EECS University of California Berkeley EECS 105 Spring 2002 Lecture 17 R T Howe A Better Technique It is much more efficient to work with imaginary exponentials as representing sinusoids since these functions are direct solutions of linear differential equations j t d j t e j e dt Note that EEs use j 1 1 2 rather than i since the symbol i is already taken for current Dept of EECS University of California Berkeley EECS 105 Spring 2002 Lecture 17 R T Howe Using Imaginary



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