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FSU SYG 1000 - Test 3: Lecture Notes

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Test 3: Lecture NotesTest 3: Lecture NotesNotes from 3/5/13• Everyone is deviant, deviance is the norm.• Defining devianceo Behavior that deviates from the norms Assumption: everyone knows the norms (consensus)o Big 3 Theories and Deviance Functionalism Interaction Conflict• Review/Policyo Deviance: modes of action that do not conform to the norms or values held ny most members of a group of societyo Norm: (laws, folkways, and morals) rules of conduct that specify appropriate behavior in a given range of social situations Failure to conform Are not stationary Change depending on timeo Violation of Norms: If no one reacts to violations in norms is it deviance?• Types of Devianceo Any deviation from the norms of everyday lifeo Behavior is in question If behavior is in accordance with norms then it is okay if not then it's deviance.o Think broadly• Contrasto Not all forms of deviance are crimes and not all crimes are deviant• Myths and devianceo Views of deviance depend on definitions of normso Deviance doesn’t only apply to criminalso Deviance involves willfulness (willfulness is not clearly defined)o Deviance takes place everyday by everyone.Deviance Deviance and Crime Crime• Fighting• Being Handicapped• Mental Illness• Homicide• robbery• Not following the speed limit• Underage drinking• J-walking• Taking the life of many is not inherently devianto Wars coincide with the norms and values of most people of a society while homcide does not• Fist fighting is not inherently deviant because boxing is a sanctioned sport.o Fighting in the form of self-protection does not go against societal norms • What is labelled as deviant, depends on who is in power because people in power define the norms.o These people substantiate norms and define deviances.o Ex. The drinking/card game Kings Cup (Ring of Fire) This game has rules you can choose to follow or not to follow. The game has both informal sanctions (social rejection) and formal sanctions (taking a shot).• Rules and Instiutionso Institutionalized Normso Laws formalize the norms of institutions.o Behavior (action) creates norms (structure). Stucture can effect action.Power Flows In and OutInstitutionsBiological and Pyscological Perspectives Causality Conditioned by social conditions• Ex. Gendered bodies give rise to meanings of physical attributes Patterns-result of social conditions Individual Pathologism (stigmas)• Social conditions are conducive to poverty• People tend to blame the victim (not the social conditions) for societal ills that are out of personal control• Steps for Victim Blamingo Identify Problemo Identify group differences (biological, social, cultural)o Blame problem on group differences• Systematic distortion of informationo What is “real” can be altered because consciouness can be manipulated.• Functionalism and Deviance • Durkeimo Anomie: individuals don’t subscribe to norms which predisposes them to deviance (often called crime) Can have positive consequences Deviance serves some function to society (don’t rid the world of deviance but keep it within acceptable limits)• Reminds us of shared values• Postive self-evalulation• Integrated soceity by punishing deviance• Clarifies moral boundaries Erikson’s View of Durkeim o We have enough crime and we must do something about it Defintions of deviance and crime are constantly changing to fit crime and to expand prisonso Merton Ideologies often don’t add up to the reality experiences by the masses. This leads to strain. Relative Deprivation: American’s preoccupation with success and conformity leads to increased crime rateso Cohen Deviance is not about the individual it is about groups Social situations turn into patterns which lead to a subculture Deviant subcultures occur more often in the lower classes and are based on values that oppose the dominant cultureo Cloward and Ohlin Lack of Opportunity Theory- everyone does not have the opportunity to achieve the same norms Can be applied to concepts other than poverty ex. People of power make rules that those with out power are forced to follow• Interactionist Theory Functional tendencies• Differential Association-Sutherland• Associating with deviants causes deviance in others Limitations of Functionalist Theories (deviance as a violation of the norm) p. 174• People in poorer communities don’t aspire to the same level of success as more affluent people, most adjust their aspirations to the reality of their situation• Middle class values are not accepted through out society• People in upper classes also feel pressures toward criminal activity (white collar crimes) Quasi conflict-oriented tendencies• Labelling-Beckero Deviance as a social reaction: the process of interaction between deviants and nondeviants (p.174) Nothing is inherently deviant by the reactions of others makes something devianto Is a behavior deviant if no one deems it as such?o Ex. Someone witnesses someone moving computers out of a building. Can go unrecognized unless it is labeled as theft.o Deviance is a labeling process and this labelling takes place at different levels.o Limited by the fact that labelling theory neglects the processes that lead to acts being defined as deviant Labeling is not arbitrary: differences in socialization, attitudes, and opportunities influence how far people engage in behavior that is likely to be considered deviant (p. 175)o It is also unclear if labelling increases deviant conduct other factors could be involved (p.175)• Primary Deviation/Secondary Deviation -Lemert (can be used to explain mass shootings) p. 174o Primary Deviation: intial transgression (experience connected to deviant behavior)o Secondary Deviation: Role created to deal with society’s condemnation of that behavior, individual then acts accordingly Me vs. Them, “Society is against me”o Once a child is labeled as deliquent, they are perceived as different by everyone. The child then relapses into more severe acts of deliquency o Small violations of norms (like acting differently or standing out) can casacade into horrible criminal acts Example: “Slut Shaming”: dicated by men (those in power)- labeling is conducted by those in power• Conflict Theory o Piven and Cloward Rule breaking is aligned with power (deviance is in response to social inequalities)o


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