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ISU HIS 102 - Slavery and Empire

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HIS 102 1st Edition Lecture 9 Outline of Last Lecture I. Europe and world trade before Columbus II. The age of discovery: Europe and merchant capitalism III. The role of Portugal IV. The Columbian momentOutline of Current Lecture I. Slavery in AfricaA. Era of market/merchant capitalism (1500-1750)B. Trans-Saharan slave trade (7th-19th centuries)1. International trade (two major sources before European contact)2. Slaves were prisoners of war>massive numbers of workers in the fieldsC. In Africa, kingship and lineage was great in their society1. This is destroyed and the stain of slavery is lessenedD. In the Americas, slavery becomes about race and becomes permanentII. The Sugar EconomyA. Portugal also begins participation in the slave trade1. Slave trade brought back to Europe B. By 1450, 10% of capital was African1. Begin sugar plantations and use slaves as laborers2. Sao Tome is the first large scale sugar growing plantation and becomes the establishment for sugar growingC. 1502, Portuguese discover Brazil and begin harvesting wood1. 1520’s, Portuguese planters begin growing sugar in Brazil and begin bringing in slaves2. Start of the sugar economy in the AmericasD. 1620’s, the Dutch become an economic powerhouse and take over Brazil for a bit1. 1640’s, Portugal takes it backE. Sugar economy moves to the Caribbean (Barbados)F. 1640’s-1650’s, English learn from Dutch and begin to grow sugar1. Don’t have enough workers>indentured servants 2. Solution: expand slave trade in Africa3. By 1650’s, many Europeans come to seize Caribbean islandsThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.4. By 1700’s, Europeans begin to compete III. New World Slavery-some #’sA. 12.4 million people stripped of their lives>pushed into European slave tradeB. Middle passage: Africa to the AmericasC. 1650, mortality rate 25%, by 1750 down to 15% (too expensive to lose slaves)D. When captured, 15% died. Within first year, 15% died.E. 1780’s reaches peak of slave trade1. 80,000 slaves traded a year2. This is the foundation of the New World economyIV. Slavery and ModernityA. The growth of slavery1. The desire for sugar2. Radical views that exist


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