New version page

FSU RTV 3001 - Test 2

Upgrade to remove ads

This preview shows page 1-2-19-20 out of 20 pages.

Save
View Full Document
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 20 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 20 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 20 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 20 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience

Upgrade to remove ads
Unformatted text preview:

Test 2Ch 8- Composition of pictorial elements is key to a great video- Hard to achieve when objects continually move- You must think in terms of structuring a dynamic visual field of on screen space- Think about elements that move, continuity in all your shots; think about sequence Interplay of screen forces- Six major types:o Main directionso Magnetism of the frameo Asymmetry of the frameo Figure and groundo Psychological closureo Vectors- Structuring the 2-D field means making these forces work for you to show events with clarity and impact Distribution of Graphic Mass and Magnetic Force- The field can be stabilized by balancing the forces of graphic mass and magnetism of the frameo Graphic objects carry graphic weight, determined by dimension of the object (how much screen space it takes up), its basic shape, its orientation, its location within the screen, and its color - Screen- centero This is the most stable position for any objecto The surrounding areas and magnetic forces are evenly distributed- Off- centero As soon as you move an object out of the center of the frame, its graphic weight and themagnetism of the frame come into playo The shot or picture may begin to look unbalanced- Counterweightingo There are several ways to correct imbalance Center your object through camera or object movement  Counterweight the object with another object or a graphic element with similar graphic weight Distribution of Vectors- Noseroom (index) and leadroom (motion)o Once a shot of a person is properly composed, if he/she turns camera left and assumes as 4/3 profile, you should pan left slightly to provide leadroom in the shot. This “leading” the talent creates an aesthetic space just ahead of the talent’s face, so this leadroom in shots featuring human subjects is sometimes called noseroomo Leadroom is important because viewers become aesthetically uncomfortable when it seems a subject is running out of space within the frame o You must give the vector enough space to run its course off screen o Noseroom is used for index (non-moving) vectors, and leadroom is used for motion vectorso You don’t want your vectors to crash into the edge of the screen (unless you’re trying to create an extremely tense or uncomfortable feeling in your audience)- Converging vectorso Two index vectors coming together balance each other out- Graphic vectorso Although weal, the lines of graphic vectors can be used for stabilizationStages of Balance - Golden section—comes from Renaissance art, it is a way to divide the artistic space into a small section and a large section- A horizontal dimension is divided in two unequal parts by a real or imaginary dividing the line (3x5)- Even though the parts are unequal, objects arranged according to the golden section will be in balance- Hard to use with moving images, but valuable when framing static shots - Rule of thirdso The rule of thirds (an application of the Golden ratio) is a guideline commonly followed by visual artists. The objective is to keep the subjects and areas of interest (such as the horizon) out of the center of the image, by placing them near one of the lines that would divide the image into three equal columns and rows, ideally near the intersection of those lines- Labile Balanceo Distributions of graphic weight, frame magnetism, and vectors are pushed to their limito The instability makes energy and graphic tension very high - There are several techniques to achieve labile balance:o Overload one side of the screen with graphic weight o Provide vectors with insufficient space to play outo Constantly make high-energy vectors convergeo Tilt the horizontal line (the easiest way to achieve tension)- We perceive labile balance as high energy—we almost physically want to keep the objects from slipping out of frameObject Framing- When you frame your shots, your viewer will not be able to see every part of whatever object you use- This requires the viewer’s mind to fill in what they can’t see using psychological closure- Facilitating closureo Arrange your visual content so that the viewer can organize it into recognizable patterns- Graphic cueso Using dominant graphic vectors may help give the viewer some orientation in complex shots- Natural dividing lineso People and objects must be framed so that the viewer does not have trouble filling in missing informationo Premature closure occurs when the upper or lower screen edge coincides with natural dividing lineso Frame people so that these lines fall either inside or outside the upper and lower screenedges - Premature Closureo Improper framing leads to premature closure—occurs when the vector field within the frame entertains such easy psychological closure that the image no longer compels us toextend it beyond the screen- Illogical closureo When we try to make sense of the images we look at, we sometimes form patterns that are illogical and should not be formedo This is called illogical closure, when we make complete images out of elements that do not go together - Unusual Compositionso Breaking the rules may be necessary when you need to startle your viewers or make them pay attention to something particular o Unusual compositions can sharpen your message in a subtle and compelling way Unbalance your shot to draw attention to a particular weighty element Place objects slightly off screen, forcing your audience to use psychological closure Place objects way off center, allowing the magnetism of the frame to act on them Ch 9Depth and Volume- TV and film require us to project a 3D world onto a 2D surface- The camera and our eyes allow this projection to happen in a believable way- The key is what the camera sees, not what you see- The 3D field covers the z-axis, monocular graphic depth factors, depth characteristics of lenses,and binocular depth The z-axis - The x-axis and the y-axis define the width and the height of a 2D plane, like a TV screen- The z-axis describes depth- It is an imaginary line that extends from the front of the camera lens to the horizon - Used to help create the illusion of depth, that extends from the front of the camera lens to the horizon - Important because TV is two dimensional and can help add depthMonocular Graphic Depth Factors- There are 5 factors that contribute to creating the illusion of depth on the 2D plane:o Overlapping planeso Relative sizeo Height in planeo Linear perspective o Aerial perspective - Overlapping planeso Use the


View Full Document
Download Test 2
Our administrator received your request to download this document. We will send you the file to your email shortly.
Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view Test 2 and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view Test 2 2 2 and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?