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FSU RTV 3001 - Study Guide

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1. Graphic Mass – A precisely defined screen area. Seen as a figure against a ground. The larger the object, the more graphic weight it has. Essentially it is how prominent on object is on screen. 2. Balance – The Structural stability of objects on screen. 3. Screen Center – The most stable position on screen. It is located dead center, and allthe magnetic forces are distributed symmetrically.4. Off Center – When an object is towards the edge of a screen, it has a magnetic affect towards the edge it is closest to. It’s graphic weight also increases at this point.5. Counterweighting – If one object is towards the edge of the screen, you can add another object to the screen to balance out the shot. This distributes the magnetism,and causes the two objects to gravitate towards the center of the screen.6. Noseroom – The space in front of a person looking towards the edge of a screen. So if a person is on the left side of the screen, looking to the right, the nose room would be all the empty space on the screen, in the direction he is looking at.7. Leadroom – Essentially the same as noseroom, only this takes place in motion picture, not still photography. So if a person is walking from left to right, and the camera is following him, all the area in front of him is the leadroom. 8. Stabile Balance – also known as static balance. This type of balance gives off the impression of stability and that an object isn’t and cant move. A shot of a house, symmetrical on both sides would be a good example. 9. Dynamic Balance – when a shot is asymmetrically distributed. This adds aesthetic energy due to tension caused by vectors.10. Liable Balance – unstable balance. This can be achieved by tilting the horizon line.11. The Golden Section – The division of the screen into roughly 3x5 units. If you were to divide a normal piece of paper into a section that is 3/5ths, and the other into a section that is 2/5ths, the line where they meet is the golden section. This helps the cameraman line up a shot, and is the ideal spot where something should go. 12. The Rule of Thirds – divide the screen into three horizontal and three vertical lines. This is a variation of the Golden Section, and helps line up a shot.13. Psychological Closure – When our minds try to automatically fill in gaps that the video does not portray. The brain will automatically organize material, and if something is seen as unfit, it will try to correct it. For example, if a person is on screen, and the top of his head is cut off by the edge, we will know that the person’s head is just not seen on screen. We will not assume that he is missing the top half of his head, but that it’s just not on screen.14. Natural Dividing Lines – Some examples of these would be the eyes, nose mouth andother key checkpoints of a person. If a frame cuts off a person at one of these natural dividing lines, premature closure will take place. Premature closure is whenwe as viewers no longer extend the image outside of the frame. If a shot’s edge coincides with these lines, the viewer will look just at what’s inside the frame, and not visually extend it.15. Illogical Closure – The human mind will group together objects if they are close and look like they are supposed to go together, even if they are not. For example, if a news reporter is standing by a street, and a street sign is right above his head, we will perceive that as resting on his head, of acting like a hat. Essentially is is whenwe group together items because they look like they flow together, and actually theydo not.16. Z axis – The axis that defines depth. If you were to hold up a piece of paper, the tall vertical side would be the Y axis, and the smaller horizontal side would be the X axis.If you then stabbed a pencil through the paper, that would be the z axis. The farther along the z axis an object is from the viewer, the farther away he will appear, and vice versa.17. Overlapping Planes – if an object stands in front of another object, you can obviouslytell that the object not being covered is in front. This is a good way to establish depth. The objects being covered are behind the objects that you can fully see.a. Wide Angle Lens – Since the objects are more stretched out along the Z axis, overlapping planes are not an essential way of measuring depth. b. Narrow Angle Lens – This makes objects appear closer together. The objects are more squished, and they overlap more. This makes overlapping planes essential to tell the depth of a shot.18. Relative Size – If you know how big an object is, you can tell how far the object is from the camera by its size. If the object appears to be large, it is close to the camera, and if it’s small, its far away. If two objects are similar in size, then the one that is bigger looking on screen is closer to the camera.a. Wide Angle – This exaggerates relative size. Since its so stretched out, the front most objects are large, and then objects that are just a few feet behind appear really small, only due to the fact that it’s all stretched.b. Narrow Angle – This does a better job of showing the true depth of a scene. For a good example, look at figure 9:30 and 9:31 in the book19. Linear Perspective – This states that all objects look progressively smaller the farther they are. At the same time, parallel lines converge towards the middle of thescreen as they go off into the distance. If you are looking down a hallway on scree, the edges start at the sides towards the front, and end up in the middle the farther they go.a. Wide Angle – accelerates the convergence of parallel lines, and they are seen to converge more quicklyb. Narrow Angle – This constricts the normal convergence, and reduces the illusion. 20. Forced Perspective – Causing parallel lines to converge faster and making distant objects appear smaller than we would ordinarily perceive. This gives off the impression of distance.21. Ariel Perspective – This is another way of measuring depth due to the fact that we can see objects up close better than those that are far away. If you’re looking at the mountains, you can see the ones up close really well, but due to the fog and clouds inthe sky, the mountains in the background are not as easily visible.22. Foreground – Depth plane closest to the Camera23. Middleground – Depth plane marking the middle of the z axis, in between foreground and


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