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FSU RTV 3001 - Key Terms Defined

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Key Terms Defined1. Aesthetic processes- Applied Aesthetics- study of visual and auditory perceptions due to elements, such as lighting and frame composition, and how these perceptionscan be most effectively clarified, intensified, and interpreted through television and film.o Part of everyday life- Figure- ground principle- ordering surroundings into foreground figures that lie in front of, or move against, a more stable background.- Selective seeing- Our tendency to see only such events and event details, as we are interested in and/or that seem to confirm our perceptual expectations and prejudices.- Selective perception- Automatic reduction of unnecessary details during the perception process. - Context- the environment in which we perceive and evaluate specific perceptual phenomena. Every aesthetic element operates within, and is dependent on, the context of all others.o “Bottom-up”- context is imposed by the event itselfo “Top-down”- based on the intentionality of your actions. - Associative context- establishes and applies a code that dictates, at least to some extent, how you should feel about an event.- Aesthetic context- perceptual processes are so immediate and forceful that we respond to certain stimuli in predictable ways even when we know that we are being perceptually manipulated.- Applied Media Aesthetics: Method- based loosely off Leo da Vinci’s Notebooks, in which he describes the “Then Attributes of Sight Which Find Expression in Painting”o Kandinsky said it is an inductive process of building a scene by combining “graphic elements”- the fundamental building blocks ofpainting, such as lines, planes, color, texture. - Fundamental Image Elements- four fundamental and aesthetic elements of video and film are…a. Light and colorb. Spacec. Time/motiond. Sound- Encoding- translating an idea into a message for specific communication medium- Familiarity with formal elements of applied media aesthetics and their respective fields will enable one to exercise creativity to fullest. Light (purpose)- Light- Radiant energy that behaves commonly as electromagnetic wayso Usually defined as “visible radiant energy” even though it is invisibleo If our surroundings didn’t reflect light we would live in darkness- Purposes 1) Manipulate and articulate our perception of the environment2) Establish an aesthetic context for our experiences- a framework that tellsus how we should feel about a certain event.3) See and feel in a specific way.o We can articulate our outer space/time environment and our inner environment- our emotions - Lighting reveals what objects look like, where they are located, and what surface textures they have. o Lighting can bypass our usual cognitive perceptual screens- our rational faculty with its critical judgment- and affect us directly and immediately. o Has both outer and inner orientation functions because it helps articulate our inner and outer environments. o Lighting in television and film is the deliberate manipulation of light and shadows for a specific communication purpose o Lighting lets media professionals tell their viewers what time of year or time of day it is (outer), and also what emotions are going on in the scene (inner).- What light HAS to Do:o Provide for sufficient illumination to record a film and make up for differences in contrast for the eyeo Enhance the illumination of two and three dimensionColor temperature vs. color energy - Light is referred to as having color temperature. o Sunlight: Blueyo Artificial Light: Orangeyo Fluorescents: Greeny- Color Temperature – Relative bluishishness or redness of white light measured in Kelvin degrees. o Video cameras must be adjusted to the color temperature of prevailing light. o Even though we talk about “white light”, the light we see is never pure white.o Some white light is reddish, some is bluish, some is greenish: this is color temperature.a) The more bluish the light, the higher the color temperature.b) The more reddish the light, the lower the color temperature.- Color Energy- the aesthetic impact a color has on us.o The energy of a color depends on…a) Hue, b) Saturation,c) Brightness of a color.- It also has to do with…a) The size of the color area b) The contrast between foreground and background.- Warm colors have more energy than cool ones.a) A bright yellow has more energy than a brown.- Saturation of a color contributes to its energy.o If equally saturated, a warm red will have more energy than cold blue, but if the red is desaturated or faded, the blue will become more energetic.o Large color areas carry more energy than small color areas of similar saturation.o Colors have more energy when set against a background of contrasting brightness.o The benefit of translating colors into aesthetic energy is that you can integrate the effects of color more readily with other aesthetic elements to produce a variety of specific emotional effects. (Music, sfx, angles)o This knowledge allows you to effectively conceptualize and use color composition in moving images.Shadows- attached vs. castShadows- When we design lighting, shadows become very important.- You can’t intensify and clarify the shapes and textures of people and things through simple illumination – you do that with shadow.- Attached shadows- a shadow that is on the object itself. It cannot be seen as independent of (detached from) the object. o Help us primarily with interpreting an objects basic shape and textureo Inevitably fixed - Cast- A shadow produced by an object and thrown (cast) onto a surface (part of the object itself or another surface.) o Created when the positioning of the light source is such that the shadow ofone object is cast across another object or part of the setting- May be object-connected o Shadow touches the object producing it- May be object- disconnectedo Shadow does not touch the object producing it- Cast shadows help us locate an object relative to its surroundingso Indicates whether the object rests on the table or noto Cast shadows become independent as soon as you move the object away from the surface on which it is resting.o It has quite a sharp or more definite edge to it. o Get fuzzier and lighter/softer as the object moves farther away from the table. - Cast Shadows:a. Indicate locationb. Provide dramac. Tell storyo Some cast shadows, you don’t want, such as the microphone boom or the camera shadow.o During production, it’s important to


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