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FSU CPO 2002 - Notes

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Ch 1Comparative politics= focuses on politics within nationsInternational relations= focuses on politics between nationsPolitical science=Comparative politics and international relations are not mutually exclusive because of the few examples given in the graph in the book(revolution, political economy and environmental politics).CP and IR are also not collectively exhaustive because of American politics and public policyCh 2three different type of questions we ask in political science1. evaluative question= how should the world lookex. Should the US go to war with Iran? Should the president have the power to declare war? Should the rich be taxed a a higher rate than the poor? ----also normative questions2. descriptive questions= how does the world look?Ex. How many chambers does the Swedish legislature have? How powerful is the president of France? How many parties are in the UK?3. Explanatory questions= why does the world look this wayEx. Why does an event occur? What causes some event? Why are some sates democratic but other authoritarian? Why do dictatorships become democraciesWhich of these questions is the best prepared to answer?Steps in the scientific process1. Systematic observation/ questions2. Experiment- Game theory/ model/regression analysis3. Formulate hypothesis/ implications4. Measurement5. Observe/test/ evaluateConfirm/ reformulateWhat must be true for political science to be a science?1. It must accumulate knowledge over time2. Science helps answer explanatory questions, which can motivate evaluative questions or inform answers to evaluative questions3. Scientific processCh 3Politics=Political science=Exit= you accept a negative change in your environment, and you alter your behaviorVoice= to try to change the environment back to its original conditionLoyalty= you accept the fact that your environment has changed and you make no change to your behaviorBackward induction= is used to solve extensive form game. It is the process of reasoning backward, from the end of the game or situation to the beginning, in order to determine an optimal course of action. Finds subgame perfect equilibrium (SPE)Strategic situation=in this, the choices of one actor depend on the choices made by other actorsSocial contract: the aforementioned agreement between the state and its citizens. It outlines the responsibilities for each entity. The agreement is implicit.Two implications for voice to work1. The citizen must have a credible exit threat (E>0)2. The state must be dependent on the citizen (L>1)Ch 4Nation: a group of people who share some sort of identity, such as a language, religion, history or ethnicity.Nation- State: As state where a single nation predominated and the legal social, demographic, and geographic boundaries of the state are connected in important ways to the state.- commonalities existed before the state was formed.Ex. Israel- formed around the jewish state and religion.Failed state: a state-like entity that cannot coerce and is unable to successfully control the inhabitants of a given territory.Ex. Somalia-Ch 5Polyarchy: a political regime with high levels of both contestation and inclusion.What is the difference between the substantive view of democracy and the minimalist view of democracy?Substantive view of democracy- classifies political regimes in regard to the outcome they produceMinimalist view of democracy- classifies political regimes in regard to the institutionsIf you have a leader that’s not was not elected democratically but turns into e democracy (EGYPT-he referenced in class) then it is allowsMinimalist- democratic institution= democracy. Does not say anything about non-democratic institutions producing a democracy.-Type of electoral rules (SMDP, alternative vote, two-round)Ordinal measure – classifies cases into categories that have a natural orderingEx. college football rankings. Just number orderings. The 5th team is not 5x worse the first. Social class- upper, middle class, elite. GPA.-Ideology (strong liberal, liberal, moderate, conservative, strong conservative)-Freedom house scores (not free, partly free, free)Interval/ cardinal measure- assigns a number to cases such that the distance between the units are equal.Ex. dollar. One dollar is ½ two dollars. Age. GDP.Independent variable – the variable used to explain the outcome-review old questions- if he asks one question on other exams- tells what isnot going to be on the final exam.- neo-Marxists= say that we should not increase the taxes on the rich bc it would decrease investment and increase spending… akak not helping the economyCh 1- Comparative politics= focuses on politics within nations- International relations= focuses on politics between nations- Political science=- Comparative politics and international relations are not mutually exclusive because of the few examples given in the graph in the book(revolution, political economy and environmental politics).- CP and IR are also not collectively exhaustive because of American politics and public policyCh 2three different type of questions we ask in political science1. evaluative question= how should the world lookex. Should the US go to war with Iran? Should the president have the power to declare war? Should the rich be taxed a a higher rate than the poor? ----also normative questions2. descriptive questions= how does the world look?Ex. How many chambers does the Swedish legislature have? How powerful is the president of France? How many parties are in the UK?3. Explanatory questions= why does the world look this wayEx. Why does an event occur? What causes some event? Why are some satesdemocratic but other authoritarian? Why do dictatorships become democraciesWhich of these questions is the best prepared to answer?Steps in the scientific process1. Systematic observation/ questions2. Experiment- Game theory/ model/regression analysis3. Formulate hypothesis/ implications4. Measurement5. Observe/test/ evaluateConfirm/ reformulate What must be true for political science to be a science?1. It must accumulate knowledge over time 2. Science helps answer explanatory questions, which can motivate evaluative questions or inform answers to evaluativequestions3. Scientific processCh 3Politics=Political science=Exit= you accept a negative change in your environment, and you alter your behaviorVoice= to try to change the environment back to its original conditionLoyalty= you accept the fact that your environment has changed and you make


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