New version page

UIUC HDFS 105 - Infancy- Language and Psycho-Social Development

This preview shows page 1 out of 3 pages.

View Full Document
View Full Document

End of preview. Want to read all 3 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a GradeBuddy member to access this document.

View Full Document
Unformatted text preview:

HDFS 105 1st Edition Lecture 6 Outline of Last Lecture I. BirthA. Parent-infant bondingB. Possible birth complications and risks II. The newborn infanta. Sensory capacities b. Wolff’s states of consciousness c. Feeding d. Reflexese. SIDSf. Teratogensg. Circumcision Outline of Current Lecture I. Infancy: Language DevelopmentII. Infancy: Psycho-social DevelopmentCurrent LectureI. Infancy- Language development A. Piaget's first stage of development- infancy- Sensorimotor Period i. Begins with reflexes (not planned) and then baby notices more about the environment and acknowledge the world around them ii. Coordination of motor activity and perceptioniii. Infant begins to view world as permanent place- object permanence = objects exist though they can't always be seen (ex. Baby cries in order to cause parent to come back since baby is aware that parent exists and is constant; baby understands object permanence when she is interested In playing peek-a-boo) iv. Baby's brain creates schemes to understand the world around her (putting information that they learn into categories and have mental representations to organize knowledge)v. Mental representations that organize knowledge (continues to exist as we grow; could possibly cause us to have biases)vi. Assimilation- uses existing themes to deal with new experiencesvii. Accommodation- adjust scheme to take new experience into account viii. Piaget: constructivist mindset (through exposure to environment) B. Vygotsky's Socio-linguistic TheoryThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.i. Learning- especially language learning- happens in a social context. Children learn through interactions with parents, other caregivers, and as they grow, through social interactions with other children B. How can parents impact language development?i. Talk to your children! Sing, play, etc. (interacting with them is most effective!)ii. Language stimulation through frequent human interaction is crucial for the development of language skills…also for healthy development of cognitive abilities, social skills, and emotional well-being (everything is interdependent) B. Functional importance of language i. Language contributes to communication and facilitates thought ii. Language and thought shape one another (Vygotsky) --> uses internal languageto figure things out and learn new material iii. Caretaker Speech- Motherese- Parentese (baby talk is important! -newborns can hear higher pitch tones and voices better; also important to pause and let the baby communicate back--> first occurrence of turn-taking) B. Research of Noam Chomskyi. Language is an innate (in-born) capabilityii. Human brains are equipped with an inborn "Language Acquisition Device"iii. Children will learn the language they are exposed to at birthiv. Language acquisition device enables children to detect features and rules of language B. Language as communicationi. Language is one form of message transmission ii. Body language- non-verbal communication. Children follow familiar adults' patterns in body language iii. Paralanguage- babies' babbling copies the changes in pitch, volume, expressiveness in adult languageB. Sequence of infant language development i. Cooing and babbling- 3-6 months ii. First words- 10-13 months iii. Two word sentences- 18-22 months iv. Telegraphic Speech- the language of two-year-olds! Mostly nouns and verbs. B. Bilingual children i. Children will learn languages spoken to themii. The best time to learn a second language is in early childhood (languages can just be easily embedded when you're little, but when you're older, you need to work more to make connections between the languages)iii. Refer to brain research in How to Build a Baby's Brain (Newsweek)II. Infancy: Psycho-Social Development A. Socio-emotional development i. Development of feelings and social bonds ii. Emotion- physiological changes, subjective experiences, and expressive behaviors that involve feelings (how we feel and words we could use to labelthose feelings; how to soothe ourselves when we feel certain stressful emotions) B. 3 functions of emotions i. Adaptive processes that enhance survivalii. Emotions influence cognitive activityiii. Emotions support and influence interactions with others (If we feel stressed, we won't perform effectively) C. Social referencing i. Infants by 10 months of age use the expression of others to appraise events and regulate their behavior ii. Example: parents acts frightened of storm, young child becomes afraid iii. Preschool child falls off tricycle- parent reacts with concern- child cries. If parent is not upset, child gets back on tricycle iv. Visual Cliff Experiment: (depth perception) and if mother poses a smile or other encouraging expressions, the child will more likely to crawl over even though the visual perception shows a steep fall. Baby looks around to see reactions of others in order to follow through their actions D. Temperament i. Behavior styleii. Characteristic way of responding iii. Does temperament change as we grow? -Researchers disagree iv. Thomas and Chess temperament types:1. Easy, Slow to Warm Up, Difficult ii. These basic dispositions underlie the behavior of infants, children, and adults B. Erikson's Theory i. Attachment- bond between infant and primary caregivers (affects children's success in adulthood)ii. Trust vs. mistrust- Erikson's infant stage--> baby learns that she can elicit a response from caregiver. She begins to trust that the caregiver will respond. She learns to trust, and forms attachment to caregivers B. Negative impact on emotional development i. Depressed mothers- absent role modelsii. If caregivers stop interacting, babies become stressed, withdrawniii. Language learning, cognitive learning, and emotional stability are affectediv. Orphans with little interaction with caregivers are at risk (lacks stimulation)B. Abuse and neglecti. Abuse: non-accidental physical attack on or injury to a child by those responsible for him/herii. Neglect: absence of adequate social, emotional, or physical careiii.Both are detrimental to children's emotional well-being and overall


View Full Document
Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view Infancy- Language and Psycho-Social Development and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view Infancy- Language and Psycho-Social Development and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?