UW-Madison POLISCI 106 - Two Cornerstones of Comparative Politics (4 pages)

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Two Cornerstones of Comparative Politics



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Two Cornerstones of Comparative Politics

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This lecture describes how the scientific method is involved in politics. The definition of a theory is given and different types of variables are discussed. Finally, correlation and causation are compared.


Lecture number:
4
Pages:
4
Type:
Lecture Note
School:
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Course:
Polisci 106 - Introduction to Comparative Politics
Edition:
1

Unformatted text preview:

POLI SCI 106 1st Edition Lecture 4 Outline of Last Lecture 1 What is Democracy 2 Key Elements 3 Democratic System 4 Recognizing a Democracy 5 Ideal Types 6 Democracy A Process 7 Democracy The Outcomes 8 Critiques of 3 Models Outline of Current Lecture The Scientific Method 1 Two Cornerstones of Comparative Politics 2 The Scientific Method 3 Basis of Explanation Theory 4 Key Characteristics of a Theory 5 Research Design 6 Variables 7 Correlation Between Variables 8 Correlation vs Causation 9 Spurious Correlation 10 Quick Review 11 Experiments Current Lecture The Scientific Method Two Cornerstones of Comparative Politics comparison learning and understanding by comparing 2 cases scientific method employs set of rules and methods for investigating reality logically and systematically The Scientific Method Key Elements Definition all about precision and consistency Description must know what we can about our subject before we can analyze it These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor s lecture GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes not as a substitute Explanation answering why how who when etc questions Basis of Explanation Theory Theory preposition re how we think the world works makes set of generalizations that week to explain real world phenomenon evaluate the applicability of theories by examining if they can account for what we observe in the real world we can dismiss theories that not to hold and through a continuous process of elimination we approximate the truth Key Characteristics of a Theory theories are never right building theory process of continuous scrutiny re evaluation and adaptation some theories are widely or almost universally accepted theories must be falsifiable must be capable of being proven wrong ex of non falsifiability Little green men live among us in hiding Research Design Empirical analysis systematic analysis of data does not make value judgments not normative objective find cause and effect



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