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FSU MMC 2000 - Exam 2

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MMC2000 Exam 2 Book Notes OutlineChapters 3,5,6,7I. Chapter 3: BooksA. A Short History of Books1. Most people coming tot eh New World only brought religious books or no book at all because they were usually poor, uneducated, and had no leisure time to read2. Cambridge Press: first printing press in North American, 1638; printed religious and government documentsa) All printing (by anyone) had to get permission from colonial governors who were loyal to the crown3. Stamp Act of 1765: required all printing be done on paper with a government seal; caused the colonists to revolt and use the printing press to further the revolution by printing pamphlets, accounts of protests, etc, until the Act was canceled4. After the War of Independents, printer/bookshops became clearinghouses for collection, exchange, and dissemination of information, providing numerous people with a place to read with others5. Linotype: invented by German immigrant Ottmar Mergenthaler, used a typerwritter-like keyboard to enable printers to set type mechanically rather than manually6. Offset lithography: made it possible to print from photographic plates rather than heavy and fragile metal casts7. Dime novels: Iwrin and Erastus Beadle 1860; published novels that sold for 10 cents; concentrated on frontier and adventure stories as they attracted a lot of readersa) Also called pulp novelsB. Books and Their Audiences1. Books are the least “mass” in mass media in audience reach and magnitude of the industry itself2. Publishing houses produce narrowly or broadly aimed titles for readers3. Because of the lack of need for advertisers and attracting mass audiences, publishers can put out books with more radical and variety of ideas4. Books are sold as individual units, unlike TV programs, allowing more “voices” to survive in the industry5. Books are a powerful cultural force for these reasons:a) Books are agents of social and cultural change. Free of the need to generate mass circulation for advertisers, controversial, revolutionary ideas can reach the public.b) Books are an important role in cultural respiratory, containing certainty and truth about the worldc) Books are our windows into the pastd) Books are important sources of personal development. In addition to self-help books, books speak to s more individually than advertiser-supported mediae) Books are wonderful sources of escape, entertainment, and personal reflectionf) The purchase and reading of a book is much more individual, personal matter than consuming advertising-supported (TV, radio, newspaper) or heavily promoted (popular music and movies) mediag) Books are mirrors of culture6. A book is “censored” when someone in authority limits the publication or access to it7. Aliteracy: people possess the ability to read but are unwilling to do soa) Censorship is being done through not reading; reading proficiency is declining quickly b) People who read less, read less well, and therefore do poor in school, the job market, and in civic lifeC. Scope and Structure of the Book Industry1. Sales categories of books:a) Book club editions: books sold and disturbed (sometimes published) by book clubs; these organizations offer trade, professional, and more specialized titlesb) El-hi: textbooks produced for elementary and high schoolc) Higher education: textbooks produced for colleges and universitiesd) Mail-order books: advertised on TV, delivered by mail, and usually are specialized series or elaborately bound special editions of classic novels (such as Time-Life Books)e) Mass-market paperbacks: typically published only as paperback and designed to appeal to broad readershipf) Professional books: reference and education volumes designed specially for professionals, ie. Doctors, lawyersg) Religious books: volumes such as the Bible, catechisms, hymnalsh) Standardized tests: guides and practice books designed to prepare readers for various examsi) Subscription reference books: publications such as the Encyclopedia, dictionaries, and atlases bought directly from publishers rather than in retailj) Trade books: hard- or soft-cover and include fiction and nonfiction books, as well as cookbooks, biographies, art books, etck) University press books: comes from publishing houses associated with and often underwritten by universities; typically serious nonfiction and scholarly books2. Acquisitions editor: person charged with determining which books publisher will publisha) Some ideas reach them unsolicited but most ideas but first get an agent who can serve as an intermediary between publisher and write, before reaching the editorb) Some publishing houses allow acquisitions editor to say yes or no based on their own judgment; at other publishing houses, editors must prepare a case for the projects they want and have it reviewed by a proposal committeec) If a “yes” is achieved, writer and publisher sign a contract together3. Once a publisher approves a book:a) Author is assisted in producing a decent manuscriptb) Some combination of the publisher’s marketing, promoting, and publicity departments plan advertising campaignsc) Book tours and signing are scheduled with release of bookd) Within the first few months of the release, publish will determine if the book will succeed or faile) If the book is successful, more copies are madef) If the book fails, printing stops and unsold copies are returned to the publisher, as remainders, at a discount price D. Trends and Convergences in Book Publishing1. Convergence is altering almost all aspects of the book industry2. E-publishing: publication of book initially or exclusively online3. E-book: book downloaded in electronic form from the Internet to a computer or handheld PDA device4. E-publishing allows anyone with a computer and novel to bypass traditional publishers and have an outlet for their work5. E-books can be published instantly, unlike the much longer process of regular book publishing6. Authors who distribute with e-publishers receive royalties of 40%-70%, compared with 5%-10% offered by traditional publishers7. Print-on-demand (POD): another form of e-publishing; they store works digitally, and, once ordered, a book can be instantly printed, bound, and sent to the nearest location that can put it together, such as bookstores; produces less expensive book less expensively and expands the amount of books that can be published8. E-readers: digital books with appearance of traditional books but has content that is


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