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FSU CHD 2220 - Chapter 10: Social and Emotional Development in Early Childhood

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CHD2220 Chapter 10 4/8/2013Chapter 10: Social and Emotional Development in Early ChildhoodMissed class! Do all things before aggression! • ( all etext) Development of Social Competence  Social competence- The ability to establish and maintain satisfying social interaction and relationships with peers and with adults. o Social Play Social Play:• Unoccupied behavior - the child is not involved in play and does not interact with other children or teachers.• Onlooker behavior - the child observes the play of other children with obvious interest but makes no effort to become involved in any way.• Solitary play - the child plays independently with toys that are unlike those played with by other children. There is no social contact or apparent interest in what other children are doing.• Parallel Play - the child plays beside other children with toys that are similar to those used by those children. There is no social contact with other children nor any effort to coordinate play.• Associative play - The child plays with other children, sharing materials and conversing, but there is no consistent theme to the play or division of roles.• Cooperative play - The child plays with other children in an organized manner, with roles differentiated to accomplish some goal or to act out some agreed upon play theme. Social Pretend Play• Social Pretend Play- Children acting out roles and themes associated with stories, television cartoon shows, or common family events such as supper time, or bathing baby. Social pretend play increases through the preoperational period and declines at around 6 or 7 years old as games-with-rules begin to dominate children’s social play. o Socio-dramatic play( also known as social pretend play) requires that children learn to negotiate and communicate about the roles, objects, settings, and actions that will be employed in any given “pretend engagement.”CHD2220 Chapter 10 4/8/2013 Premoting Social Pretense• Research has confirmed that children social pretend play is more positive, sustained, enjoyable, and more group-oriented than nonpretend play. Moreover, children who pretend more tend to be more socially skilled, more popular, and empathic than children who pretend. • When children are trained in sociodramatic play skills, they show improvement in perspective-taking and language development. Disadvantaged preschool children show enhanced cooperative problem-solving, IQ, role taking, and impulse control. • Social Play Relating to Peers:o (e-text) Social Preference Social Preference and social status:• Children's positive and negative social preferences are unevenly distributed among members of the peer group - that is, some children are more popular and others more rejected. Researchers have developed methods to quantify popularity and to classify children into qualitatively distinct social status groups. In the standard sociometric procedure, individual children are asked to nominate three children they most like to play with and three that they least like to play with. Positive and negative preferences have been used to classify children into social status subgroups.o Popular- those who are clearly more liked than disliked.o Rejected- those who are clearly more disliked than liked. (lecture) If the rejected kid stays rejected for a longtime, they will end up being problems in society. o Neglected- those who are neither liked or disliked.o Controversial- children who are simultaneously liked by some children and disliked by others. o Average- Children who do not fall neatly into one of these subgroups. • Children in different status groups behave very differently toward peers and, in turn, are treated very differently by peers. When popular preschool children try to enter the ongoing play of other children, they display better communication skills than rejected children they directCHD2220 Chapter 10 4/8/2013their language to all members of the group, rather than to a single child and are highly responsive to other children's communications and they provide useful information and resist expressing negative emotions during entry attempts. More popular preschool children more likely to reinforce and to be reinforced by their peers.o Friendships Friendship- an enduring close, mutual relationship between two individuals, expressed by a tendency to spend a disproportionate amount of play time together.• (lecture) children that have a lot of emotion and emotion regulation tend to end up the most popular.  Reciprocity- the idea that the relationship is shared and of mutual interest to both parties. By this definition, preschool-age children form relatively stable friendships. o Conflicts Conflict - any situation in which children find themselves opposing one another: They want the same toy at the same time; they have to be first in line at recess; they argue over who can do something better or who is smarter. While children can argue over just about anything, research has shown that conflicts center on two issues: control of objects and social influence. Quarrels over the control of objects focus on possession, access, and ownership Although conflicts may temporarily disrupt children's play, they promote social and cognitive development. (lecture) All children have conflicts! • Just because a child has conflict, doenst mean you should be worried etc. because all children come across conflict. IN general, researchers conclude that conflict is good for kids because its good for kids to learn and deal with limited resources. Sharing limited resources is a set of skills that kids need to master. As well as self sacrifice that kids need to give up for. • Conflicts don’t normally last long and they typically don’t involve aggression. • They also learn conflict resolution skills.CHD2220 Chapter 10 4/8/2013• Yet, all conflict does not lead ot positive results. If there is aggression, it can turn bad! Kids also need coaching. They need help saying im sorry, how to take deep breathes, you mentor them to help them solve their conflict.o Aggression Aggression- Purposeful efforts to inflict pain or injury on another child. ; someone who’s come up with the idea of hurting someone else that they have some purpose in mind. May be pleasurable, something they want, etc. but its always about hurt n someone in order to accomplish some type of purpose. • When you have a group of children where there are


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