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FSU HFT 1000 - Chapter 17: Food Service Segments

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Examination of Commercial and Noncommercial Food ServiceCommercial operations typically operate with the premise that they will be a revenue-generating establishmentTypical commercial establishment is referred to as a restaurant.Noncommercial establishments are typically separated into two types of classifications referred to as either self-operated or contract food service.Food Service within Commercial OperationsTypically broken down into three basic categories:1. quick service (QSR) (limited-service restaurants)primary function is to provide a limited number of food items to customers in a very short period of timetypically order through drive-thru or counter and pay before consuming food.2. casual dininginitially created to cater to the needs and want of the middle classcasual and relaxed atmospheremay involve themes (ex: seafood- Red Lobster)3. fine dining/upscale restaurants (white table cloth restaurants)a high level of service is delivered and expected by patrondécor itself helps deliver feeling of superior dining experienceHotel service is different because they often operate with extended hours for customers staying on propertyDifferent levels of menus and special limited menu for room serviceProfit margin is typically lower than that of a typical restaurantCountry Club run various types of food services from snack cart to higher end restaurant as well as special events such as weddingsAirplane companies are decreasing availability of food serviceAirports have made adjustments; quick service and casual dining restaurants in terminalsCruise Ships are known for all-you-can-eat options and themed restaurantsWalt Disney World – all types of food serviceConvenience Store – made to order food itemsNew Types of Food Service within Commercial OperationsHybrid food service establishment conceptFast-casual restaurant (ex: Steak ‘n’ Shake)Cinema-eatery – movie theater and restaurantNoncommercial Food Service OperationsInclude a wide variety of organizations such as hospitals, schools, college and universities, correctional facilities, and military operations.Military food service has seen a change over the last decade; making it feel more like a casual dining food service establishmentHas been a growth in military bases partnering with commercial establishmentsVideo Notes on American Eats: History of the PB&JThe Sandwich owes its names to 18th century Sir John Montague 4th Earle of SandwichEnd of 19th century: Peanut Butter was createdStarted out as healthy nutrition for adultsGeorge Washington CarverDid not invent peanut butterA Dr invented peanut butter in1890Created peanut butter as a way to feed protein to elderly patient who had no teethJohn KelloggPatented peanut butter, advertised as a pasty substancePeanut butter and BaconOscar MayerCreated a spread mix of the twoA caring mother sometime before WW2:Created Peanut butter and jellyGov. fed pbj to soldiersLoaded with protein, easy to store, ship and serveAmericans eat an average of nearly 3 and a half pounds of peanut butter per person per year800 million pounds total1920s: sliced bread revolutionized the sandwich worldI.F. RollwinnerHere is the link to the video:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PCxTsuFidYYManagement PrioritiesManagement positions must remain focused on keeping costs within the operating budget, as restaurants typically have a low profit margin, and close attention must be paid to all financial matters to operate profitably.Also must maintain standards of restaurant, both food and service qualityMust anticipate and keep up with changes in marketplaceFailure to maintain standards or keep with changes would result in loss of the customer base, the source of revenue for the restaurantOrganizational StructureOrganized in two operating areas:the back-of-the-house (BOH) or kitchen operationsfront-of-the-house (FOH) or dining room and all nonkitchen areasGeneral Manager oversees both areas and both areas must communicate and work with the otherStaffing system is based on the brigade system developed by Escoffier where each worker or station is assigned a specific set of tasksEach position is training for the position above, giving opportunity for advancementFront of the HouseMaître d’hotel is responsible for the overall management of serviceHost who greets guests on arrival and often handles reservationsTrains service personnel, works with sommelier to select wine, and may work with chef to develop menu.Sommelier, or wine steward, is in charge of selecting and purchasing wine for the establishment, as well as receiving and storing wineAssists guests in the wine they select and serves it to themHeadwaiter is responsible for service in a particular area of the dining room.Captain runs one area of the dining roomExplains the menu and any specials to the guests and takes ordersOversees front and back waitersFront waiters assist the captainProvide utensils and plates when needed and bring food when readyResponsible for basic of customer needsStructure is different in more casual restaurants w/ host/hostess taking reservations and greeting/seating guests, waiter explains menu, takes orders, brings out food, and clears table. Assistant manager or FOH manager is usually present to oversee operationBack of the HouseExecutive chef is in charge of all kitchen operationsDesigns the menu; hires and trains kitchen staff; is responsible for purchasing and portion/cost control for the kitchen; and sets presentation, safety, and sanitation standards for the kitchen. Often the “star attraction”Sous chef is below the executive chefParticipates in prep of food during service, organizing and supervising the operations of the kitchenTakes on the role of the aboyeur, or expeditor.Calls orders to other cooks and tells each when to begin cooking each dish, bring all the items together to go out to the table, and direct the front waiter as to the proper destinationVarious chefs de partie, or station chefs, work under the sous chef.Saucier, poissonier (fish station), grillardin, friturier (fry station), rotisseur (roast station), potager (soup station), legumier (vegetable station), entremetier (combine soup and vegetable), garde-manger (pantry station), boucher (butcher), tournant (swing cook), patissier (pastry chef), boulanger (bread baker), and confiseur (cant and confections chef)The division of labor and delegation of responsibility are decisions made by the executive chef and sous chef, based on the needs of the


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