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HIST 102 1st Edition Lecture 4 Outline of Last Lecture A. The Immigrant “Threat”A. Nativism and XenophobiaB. Immigrants were exploited by the systemC. Immigrants lived in extreme povertyD. Abuses in Politics—political machines began to appearE. The Settlement House MovementB.Women’s Suffrage emergesA.Seneca Falls Convention in 1848B.Women’s Suffrage Groups join forcesC.The Suffragettes MarchOutline of Current Lecture A. U.S. involvement in HawaiiB. U.S. interest in CubaC. U.S., Spain, and CubaD. U.S., Spain, and the PhillipinesE. The end of the warCurrent LectureA. U.S. involvement in Hawaiia. Hawaiian monarchy was reluctant to give full control to private U.S. plantation owners as sugar became a cash cropb. 1891: U.S. business influences replace the king with Queen Liluokalami, who cooperates at first but then decides Hawaii should govern itselfc. 1893: U.S. Foreign Minister Sanford Dole lies to President McKinley that the Queen is a tyrant and mistreating her people; McKinley signs off on a higher levelcoup this time—troops sent in, Queen placed on house arrestd. When McKinley discovered Dole was lying, he rejected Dole’s push to annex HawaiiB. U.S. interest in Cubaa. Spain had Cuba and Puerto Rico, but faced constant revoltsb. Spain sent in notoriously brutal military general Valeriano WeylerThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.c. U.S. newspapers began practicing “yellow journalism,” or sensationalist journalism; Hearts and Pulitzer sold the story of the Cuban independence as similar to that of the U.S.d. McKinley could no longer ignore the situation in Cuba as newspapers influenced the environment and it began to interfere with businessC. U.S., Spain, and Cubaa. U.S. first stepped in as just an intermediary, but Spain would not cooperateb. The Delone Letter insulting President McKinley, sent from a Spanish minister in D.C. to Spain, intercepted and published by a NY newspaper, creating a firestormc. Late February 1898: U.S. ship U.S.S. Maine protecting U.S. interests in Cuba’s Havana Harbor exploded, killing 266 naval personnel d. Spanish insisted they did not do it, but U.S. nonetheless blamed Spain (recently historians found out it was an accident--a boiler exploded)e. U.S. asked Spain for the following:i. Compensation for the shipii. Abandonment of Weyler’s concentration campsiii. Cessation of fighting rebelsiv. Grant Cuban independencef. Spain agreed to all but the last, and McKinley and Congress agreed to go to war April 11, 1898 through the Teller Amendment, which formally declared that the U.S. would enter war for the end of Cuban independence, and then stopg. After only 4 months, U.S. victory (only 500 U.S. soldiers out of the 1 million fighting were killed or wounded in battle)h. Much of U.S. victory was due to its increased naval power and the strategy of Theodore Roosevelt and George DeweyD. U.S., Spain, and the Phillipinesa. Roosevelt sent Dewey to Phillipines (Spanish colony) and then resigned to go fight in Cubab. With the Spanish forces split, Dewey and Alguinaldo (rebel leader) destroy the Spanish fleet (only one U.S. sailor died, but due to heat stroke)E. The end of the wara. With U.S. focus back on Cuba, the U.S. sent in its land forces b. The Army is unprepared, sent with rifles dating from the Civil War, rotting food, and wool uniforms for Cuba’s hot summer climatec. 5,000 U.S. men die from disease/malnutrition/etc.d. U.S. Army also crippled by whites refusing to fight with Cubanse. With the Cubans’ help, the U.S. cut off the Spanish fleetf. Peace talks held for the Treaty of Paris 1898 with the following conditions:i. Cuba was free and independent from Spainii. U.S. received Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Phillipines from Spainiii. U.S. also paid Spain $20 million for some of the above coloniesg. This treaty marked the beginning of the U.S.


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