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HOA 106 1nd Edition Lecture 6Outline of Last Lecture II. History and IdeasA. MonarchyIII. Painting a. Van Dyck IV. Architecture a. Inigo Jones b. Christopher Wren c. Wren’s Plan of London d. James GibbsV. Music a. Bachb. HandelVI. Music in Italy and Spain Baroque a. Allegria. Vivaldi Outline of Current Lecture VII. Rococo and Enlightenment VIII. The Rococo a. Ideasb. Stylec. paintingIX. The Enlightenment a. Ideas b. Painting Current LectureThe 18th Century: Rococo & Enlightenment - Rococo and Enlightenment o Dramatic social changeo Feudalism and monarchy were shattered, knowledge freed itself from religious dogma, and the modern world’s first democratic gov’t were createdThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.- The Rococo o Ideas  Aristocratic, international style, patronized by the elite ruling classes  King Louis XIV, died in 1715, was succeeded by his son Louis XV, who closed Versailles and returned the court to Paris  The Rococo was an elaboration of the previous Baroque style – erotic, feminine, and artificial qualities o Style  French culture was influenced by the mistress of Louis XV- Francois Boucher, Portrait of Madame de Pompadour, oil on canvas o Louis XV loved her, but was forced into another marriageo Jeanne Antoinette Poisson, was beautiful and smart o Fashion icon, brings sexual politics into France, displays femininity- The word rococo comes from the French word shell, rocaille. Aspects of the Rococo style reflect the character of shells:o Pastel, delicacy, fragile, curvilinear - Rococo art is secular, intimate, playful, and sensual o Boucher, Blonde Odalisque, oil on canvas - The size of the paintings were reduced to accommodate display in smaller sized Parisian apartments o Germain Boffrand, Salon de la Princesse, Hotel de Soubise, Paris- Architecture was an interior style ornamented with delicate gilding and pastel with white stucco applications o Balthasar Neumann, Kaisersaal (Imperial Room), Bishop’s Palace Wurzburg - Chinoiserie –imitation of Chinese culture o Influenced by the fashion for Chinese imports, particularly porcelaino Boucher, Chinese Garden, oil on canvas  Delicate, exotic, and escapist in natureo Painting  Jean-Antoine Watteau, Departure from the Island of Cythera, oil on canvas - The island of Cythera was the mythical island of love (prostitution) - Filmy, atmospheric paint effects and graceful, figures  Boucher, Venus Consoling Love, oil on canvas - Madame de Pompadour represented as the goddess Venus  Jean-Honore Fragonard, The Swing, oil on canvas - Extols forbidden love, sex, secret affairs- erotic symbolism of the swing, shoe, and hat- Painted representation of Etienne-Maurice  Falconet’s, Seated Cupid, marble- The statue is feature in The Swing  Vigee-Lebrun, Queen Marie Antoinette and Her Children, oil on canvas- The artist was a court painter and a favorite of the last queen of France, Marie Antoinette- Was supported by Mdme. Pompadour - Shows the queen and her children as reinforcing the lineage of the royal family - The Enlightenment o Ideas  Separation of church and state  Equality - Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Womeno Challenged the assumptions about the natural roles of women  Liberty - Founding America as a democracy o Thomas Jefferson, Declaration of Independenceo Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Discourse on the Origin of Inequality Among Men Rational empirical science substituting for religious culture - Joseph Wright of Derby, Experiment on a Bird with the Air Pump, oil on canvas o Upper and middle class people, not dressed like the Rococo  Optimistic belief in human progress  Good taste in judgment  Inventive spirit, interest in the future of technology - Francois Diderot, Encyclopedia: 35 volumes and 108 authors devoted to gathering together all knowledge  Cult of reason negated the escapist frivolity of the Rococo o Painting  Watteau, Gersaint’s Signboard, oil on canvas - Wealthy middle class as the new art patrons - Picture was divided into two parts because someone wanted to sell them separately  Jean-Baptiste Chardin, The Kitchen Maid, oil on canvas - Represents the women’s natural role and capabilities - Mothers, wives, household managers - ** similar to French baroque painting ** Jean-Baptiste Greuze, Village Betrothal, oil on canvas - Presents the simple values of falling in love and family in marriage - Unlike the artificial way the Rococo did  William Hogarth, Marriage a la Mode (The Fashionable Marriage), oil- A satire on the fashionable French aristocratic practice of marrying for money and property - A series of six paintings o The Marriage Settlement – two patriarchy families trying to marry their children together, the children are uninterested, the bride is being bribed by the lawyer. One family is offering family and social status, the father of the bride is offering money.o Tete a Tete - husband and wife are married but live separate lives. The bill collector is leaving. The husband has a bra in his pocket. They are not interested in each other o The Inspection – Young Lord Sqanderfield is at the office of an abortionist because he impregnated a young girl or he got syphilis from this girl. Dirty place. o The Toilette – the Countess with her lover, not the lord. o The Bagnio – the Lord finds out his wife is having an affair. The Lord breaks into his wife and lover’s motel room and is shown bleeding. He eventually dies. The wife’s reputation is ruined.o The Lady’s Death – the countess kills herself, the father is show taking wedding ring off her hand for the


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