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HOA 106 1nd Edition Lecture 7Outline of Last Lecture II. Rococo and Enlightenment III. The Rococo a. Ideasb. Stylec. paintingIV. The Enlightenment a. Ideas b. Painting Outline of Current Lecture V. Ideasa. Revolutionb. Revival of Greek and roman Forms VI. Napoleon Bonaparte a. David b. Ingresc. CanovaVII. Paris as the New Rome a. Place de la Concordeb. Vignonc. Chalgraind. Percier and FotaineVIII. Painting a. Davidb. Westc. KaufmannCurrent LectureNeoclassicism Lecture 2/5/15These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.- Ideaso Revolution  The theories of enlightenment came to fruition o Revival of Greek and roman forms  The classical ideas of heroism, self-sacrifice, and stoic resolve were renewed  Excavations began at the ancient roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum - Created the idea of art history  The first art history book, History of Ancient Art, was published by Johann-Joachim Winkelmann- Extols noble simplicity and quiet grandeur of art - Napoleon Bonaparte o Came to power in 1799 as first consul after the French revolution o Declared himself emperor o Died in exile o Portraits  Jacques-Louis David, Napoleon Crossing the Great Saint Bernard Pass, oil on canvas- Associated with the roman general Hannibal and first holy roman emperor Charlemagne  David, Napoleon in his Study, oil on canvas - Represents him as hard working and ever-vigilant  Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, Napoleon Enthroned, oil on canvas - Napoleon as a god  Antonio Canova, Napoleon, marble- As a greek god, he does not actually look like this. Modeled after famousstatue of Apollo o Paris as the New Rome  Place de la Concorde, Paris  Pierre-Alexandre Vignon, La Madelein- Built after the archeological model of roman temple  Chalgrain, Arc de Triomphe- Copies roman triumphal arch  Percier and Fotaine, Vendome Column, bronze - Copies the Roman Column of Trajan - Painting o Did not imitate antique paintings, but reflects the ideals of Neoclassical movement o Louis David, Oath of the Horatii, oil on canvas  Depicts men of the Horatii family pledging their lives to the state  King bought painting from David – saw it as a painting that supported idealism.  Was a painting about revolution? It is about strength and action and self-sacrifice  Composed in “threes” and triangles – uses colors sparingly. o David, Death of Socrates, oil on canvas  Depicts Socrates swallowing poison knowingly  Communicates self-sacrifice o David, Intervention of the Sabine Women Depicts the founding of Rome by the twins Romulus and Remus  Was inspired by the piece Abduction of the Sabine Women  roman figured inspired by the God Zeus o David, Madame Recamier She asked david to do a portrait  Inspired by reclining goddess in the Parthenon  Dressed in new Empire style dress  Presents her as a roman woman  She didn’t like the portrait because her hair was too dark o Benjamin West, Agrippina Returning with the Ashes of Germanicus,  West an American painter, returned to England after the American revolution Painting modeled after the roman Augustan Altar of Peace  Depicts modesty, faithfulness, and self-sacrifice of women o Angelica Kaufmann, Corneila Presenting her Children  Was a swiss painter  Depicts ancient roman matriarch who values motherhood over material


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