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Psyc 3110 1st Edition Lecture 10Outline of last lectureI. Components of social cognitionA. Implicit vs. explicitB. CategorizingC. SchemasD. Thought suppressionE. Body languageOutline of Current lectureII. Components of social cognition cont.F. DeceptionG. Perceiving othersIII. AttributionH. Locus of CausalityI. Stability of causalityJ. Controllability causalityDeception- Lying is a very common thing 10 lies per week- Most of the time people can’t tell when someone is lying- A given expression are what people show to us (what a person says or how they are behaving) an expression given off- more useful to see if a person is lying or not (more subtle)o Short answerso Depersonalized language (instead of saying “I did this” they would say “we did this”)o Rise in pitchPerceiving other people- After we notice a person’s appearance we can then learn about deeper things about them. (Such as personality)These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.- Certain characteristics of a person can be more important than others. This is a central trait (this can vary depending on what situation a person is in)- We make broad characterizations of people based on these central traitso This can lead to confirmation biaso If a person strays from those traits it can be shocking or upsettingAttribution: the process we go through to understand people’s behavior- As humans we don’t like to not know what is going to happen to attribution help us predict the future- This is based on two desireso Helps us interpret the world o Have control on the worldHow we begin to understand these things….Locus of Causality: where does the persons behavior originate from?- Internal attribution: based on personal characteristicso For example personality or intelligence- External attributes: different situations a person could be ino Traffic jams, having a bad dayStability of causality: stability of the behavior- Stable attributes: this has to do with things people would have to deal with over a periodof timeo Having too much on their plate- Unstable attributes: something that is unlikely to happen very ofteno Getting sick, waking up lateControllability causality: how controllable is the behavior- Controllable attributions: more responsibility is put on the persono Staying up too late, loosing track of time- Uncontrollable attributions: things that aren’t in the persons controlo Could be look at as bad luckMaking attributions: subjective- Early research was seen as objective but was later not thought of that way- Cold view of attributions: can view behavior from different perspectives to make an accurate judgmento How common is this behavior? Do other people in the environment do the same things?o Has the behavior happened before or is it unique?o Do other people experience the same things or is it just related to one individual?- Hot view of attribution, fundamental attribution erroro Tendency to internalize causes for peoples behavior and then this helps use predict their future behaviorso Perceptual salience: when we are in a situation we are focused on our surroundings but when we observe people we only focus on themo Can lead to victim blaming- Actor observer effect: we have an internal locus for others vs. an external locus for ourselves. (in other words, when we fail we tend to blame the situations vs. when othersfails we blame them)- Self serving bias: internal locus for success vs. external locus for bad things (we tend to handle our successes well and reward ourselves for success but when we have a draw back we tend to blame outside factorso Differs culture to culture**Dual process model of attribution (used a lot in social


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