New version page

UT Arlington HIST 1312 - World War II

This preview shows page 1-2 out of 7 pages.

View Full Document
View Full Document

End of preview. Want to read all 7 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a GradeBuddy member to access this document.

View Full Document
Unformatted text preview:

HIST 1312 1st Edition Lecture 4Outline of Last Lecture I. Fighting World War IIa. Good Neighborsb. The Road to Warc. Isolationismd. War in Europee. Toward Interventionf. Pearl Harborg. The War in the Pacifich. The War in EuropeII. The Home Fronta. Mobilizing for the Warb. Business and the Warc. Labor in Wartimed. Fighting for the Four Freedomse. The Fifth Freedomf. Women at WarOutline of Current Lecture III. Visions of Postwar Freedoma. Toward an American Centuryb. “The Way of Life of Freedom”c. The Road to SerfdomIV. The American Dilemmaa. Patriotic Assimilationb. The Bracero Programc. Indians during the Ward. Asian-Americans in Wartimee. Japanese-American Internmentf. Blacks and the Warg. Blacks and the Military Servicesh. Birth of the Civil Rights Movement i. The Double-Vj. The War and Racek. An American Dilemmal. Black InternationalismV. The End of the WarThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.a. “The Most Terrible Weapon”b. The Dawn of the Atomic Agec. The Nature of the Ward. Planning the Postwar Worlde. Yalta and Bretton Woodsf. The United Nationsg. Peace, but Not HarmonyCurrent LectureVisions of Postwar Freedom- Toward an American Centuryo After the war, American power and American values would underpin a previously unimaginable prosperity – “the abundant life” produced by “free economic enterprise”- “The Way of Life of Free Men”o In 1942 and 1943, the reports of the National Resources Planning Board (NRPB) offered a blueprint for peacetime economy based on full employment, an expanded welfare state, and widely shared American standard of livingo The board called for a “new bill of rights” that would include all Americans in an expanded Social Security system and guarantee access to education, health care, adequate housing, and jobs for able-bodied adultso President in 1944 – called for an “Economic Bill of Rights” which would secure full employment, an adequate income, medical care, education, and a decent home for all Americanso However, Congress did not enact the Economic Bill of Rights o However, in 1944, Congress did extend to the millions of returning veterans an array of benefits (Servicemen’s Readjustment Act or GI Bill of Rights)-The Road to Serfdomo Surprise best-seller by Friedrich A. Hayeko Claimed that even the best-intentioned government efforts to direct the economy posed threat to individual libertyo By equating fascism, socialism, and the New Deal and by identifying economic planning with a loss of freedom, he helped lay the foundation for the rise of the modern conservatism and a revival of laissez-faire economic thought The American Dilemma- Patriotic Assimilationo WII created a vast melting pot, especially for European immigrants and their childreno By the war’s end, racism and nativism had been stripped of intellectual respectability, at least outside of the South, and were viewed as psychological disorders - The Bracero Programo Bracero Program – agreed to by the Mexican and American governments in 1942, tens of thousands of contract laborers crossed into the US to take up jobs as domestic and agricultural workers until 1964o “Zoot suit” riots of 1943 –club-wielding sailors and policemen attacked Mexican-American youths wearing flamboyant clothing on the streets of LA, illustrated the limits of wartime toleranceo Fair Employment Practices Commission (FEPC) – established to fight the practice in the Southwest of confining them to the lowest-paid work or paying them lower wages than white workers doing the same jobs- Indians during the Waro 25,000 Indians served in the waro Included Navajo “code-talkers” who transmitted messages in their complex native languages that the Japanese could not deciphero Reservations did share in wartime prosperity so many chose to not return back- Asian-Americans in Wartimeo 50,000 fought in the armyo Congress in 1943 ended decades of complete exclusion by establishing a nationality quota for Chinese immigrants- Japanese-American Internmento Inspired by exaggerated fears of a Japanese invasion of the West Coast and pressured by whites who saw an opportunity to gain possession of Japanese-American propertyo Military persuaded FDR to issue Executive Order 9066 – promulgated in Feb 1942 - Ordered the relocation of all persons of Japanese descent from the West Coast - 110,000 men, women and children relocated - Did not apply to Hawaii as Japanese labor made up its economyo Internees were subjected to a quasi-military discipline in the campso Internment revealed how easily war can undermine basic freedom- The courts refused to interveneo 1944 – Korematsu v. United States: Supreme Court denied the appeal of Fred Korematsu, a Japanese-American citizen who had been arrested for refusing to present himself for internment- Justice Hugo Black upheld the legality of the internment policy, insisting that an order applying only to persons of Japanese descent was not based on raceo Government established a loyalty oath program , expecting Japanese-Americans to swear allegiance to the government that had imprisoned them and to enlist in the army- 200 young men were sent to prison for refusing the draft- 20,000 joinedo 1988 – Congress apologized and gave every survivor $20,000- Blacks and the Waro The wartime message of freedom portended a major transformation in the status of blackso The war spurred a movement of black population from the rural South to the cities of the North and West - 700,000 black migrants poured out of the South on what they called “liberty trains” seeking jobs in the industrial heartland- Blacks and the Military Serviceso WWII began with no black members in air force or marineso Army restricted the number of black enlisteeso Navy enlisted blacks only as cooks and waiterso More than 1 million blacks served in the waro GI Bill was even segregated and offered racial discrimination for blacks when they returned from war- Birth of the Civil Rights Movemento War years witnessed the birth of the modern civil rights movemento Black leader A. Philip Randolph in July 1941 led a March on Washington - Demanded access to defense employment, and end to segregation and a national antilynching lawo Roosevelt issued Executive Order 8802 – banned discrimination in defense jobs and established Fair Employment Practice Commission (FEPC) to


View Full Document
Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view World War II and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view World War II and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?