UNT RTVF 1310 - 2014Z-RTV 1310-Chapter 1 (38 pages)

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2014Z-RTV 1310-Chapter 1



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2014Z-RTV 1310-Chapter 1

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Pages:
38
School:
University of North Texas
Course:
Rtvf 1310 - Persp on Brdcst Tech
Unformatted text preview:

RTV 1310 Perspectives on Broadcast Cable and Internet Technologies More Notes on Course Content History Technology Terminology Overview Broadcast Cable Satellite Web Economics Programming Content Creation Social Impact Audience Measurement Ethics Controls How to make it Drive Persistence Organization Classroom Performance Organizations Extra Curricular Activities Contact Phyllis Slocum Phone 940 565 2041 RTFP 261 untshortfilmclub gmail com http untshortfilmclub com Katy Hancock Program Director Tovah Brown News Director Evan Nemec Sports Director Applications Online at http www kntu com How to make it Drive Persistence Organization Classroom Performance Organizations Extra Curricular Activities Make Contacts Build the pathway to your career Beginning now Chapter 1 History of Broadcast Media Chapter 1 History of Broadcast Media Information Superhighway National Information Infrastructure 1993 Invention experimentation adoption Convergence Convergence Convergence Disruption Innovation Convergence leads to questions How does new media fit in with the established media landscape and vice versa Innovation leads to disruption of old models Multi media Is content content regardless of the platform or are new methods necessary Will it all become seamless transparent How to monetize So Chapter 1 History of Broadcast Media Chapter 2 History of Cable Home Video and the Internet The first instances of convergence Chapter 1 History of Broadcast Media Preconditions Social Industrial Business Technological Social Urbanization Rise in Literacy Rate Etc Increase in leisure time Industrial Business Mass Production Techniques Mass Media Distribution Penny Press Motion Pictures Vaudeville Inventors Inventions Technological Phonograph Concept Wire 1844 Telegraph 1866 Transatlantic Cable 1876 Telephone Wireless 1873 1888 1896 1897 1899 1901 Maxwell s Theory Hertz Confirmation Marconi s Patent Marconi s Wireless Telegraph Co American Marconi Founded First Transatlantic Wireless Message Wireless Cont 1904 Fleming s Diode Patent The Inventors 1906 Reginald Fessenden tested his alternator on Christmas Eve Demonstrated that voice could be transmitted over the ether Fessenden s alternator produced a continuous wave that was needed for the transmission of voice or music 1907 De Forest s Experiments Leading to Triode Audion 1916 De Forest s Experimental Transmissions The Audion modified the Fleming valve by inserting a wire grid between the plate of the tube and its cathode This invention helped make modern electronics possible De Forest s Audion made it possible to amplify weak radio signals What about Tesla Nikola Tesla 1894 had version of electronic tube and performed transmissions 1897 had patents describing transmission experiments 1915 filed suit against Marconi 1943 Supreme Court awarded Tesla credit for some inventions formerly credited to Marconi It is speculated the fact that Marconi was suing the U S Government for use of these patents in WW I factored in to this ruling Tesla s application of radio transmissions not directed toward telegraphy or broadcasting Transmission of electricity Remote control Beam weapons Who was Nathanial Stubblefield 1892 1907 De Forest s Experiments Leading to Triode Audion 1916 De Forest s Experimental Transmissions The Audion modified the Fleming valve by inserting a wire grid between the plate of the tube and its cathode This invention helped make modern electronics possible De Forest s Audion made it possible to amplify weak radio signals Corporate Interest Legal Issues De Forest s audion got him into patent trouble with the Marconi Company Claimed the Audion infringed on the Fleming Valve patent British Marconi and its American subsidiary dominated radio General Electric AT T and Westinghouse Initially only interested in telephone communications Eventually were also interested in the radio business Patents for transmitters and receivers split among these companies and others Before World War I Radio still primarily point to point communication used like the telegraph Radio Goes to War During the First World War Because of national security interests the Navy took control of all radio operations in the U S Patent Pooling The Navy assumed all responsibility for patent infringement and installed radio equipment in all of its ships By the end of the war Technology had advanced rapidly as a result of the Navy s actions Radio Goes to War The war created a ready group of radio hobbyists after the war The war brought big business into the development of the medium after the war The Birth of Radio Corporation of America formed after the war took controlling interest of the American Marconi company subsidiary of B Marconi Parent company General Electric Company in the business of point to point communication The Birth of RCA entered into a cross licensing plan designed to solve the patent problems that would have re emerged after the war Allowed GE AT T and Westinghouse to take advantage of each others discoveries GE and Westinghouse would manufacture radio equipment RCA would sell it AT T would build transmitters Based on point to point communication as the focus New Patent Pools Worked well until the idea of broadcasting began to emerge led to the eventual dissolving of the just agreed to cross licensing agreements and the alignment of the patent holders into two rival groups Telephone Group AT T Western Electric Radio Group GE RCA Westinghouse Broadcasting s Beginnings Radio broadcasting idea grew in the 1920s because Thousands of hobbyists were trained in radio during the war Technological improvements made during the war gave radio better reception Business interests began to realize that broadcasting might make money Broadcasting s Beginnings Westinghouse RCA GE and AT T started experimental stations At the beginning of 1922 there were 28 stations actively broadcasting At the end of 1922 there were 570 Interference became a major headache Radio Group Westinghouse credited with putting the first licensed station on the air 1920 Westinghouse Chief Technician Frank Conrad conducted on air experiments Horne s Department store runs advertisement Westinghouse VP Harry Davis envisions profit potential of regular broadcast Radio Group Cont Davis business model radio station used to stimulate sales of its owner s products Davis orders Conrad to have a fully operational station on the air in time for the upcoming national general election KDKA on the air November 2 1920 Why


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