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Lecture 6Definition of OtherExpectations of others help define roles1. Altercasting- the defining of other peopleStarts with how we approach othersWe may do it in a way to get what we want from someone2. LabelingWe often define people by labels We may lock people into the labelsWe may also push them in the direction of the label (juvenile delinquent)Sometimes we need the labels to help (depressed, anxious) gets them in the front door for helpSelf-fulfilling ProphecyPrediction or expectations that you have for other people; then you do things to push people to fill the prophecyMost of the time we are unaware we are doing itRosenthal & Jacobson (1968)Tested kids, then told children they were smart and significantly most of the children did better on the second exam than they did on the first exam.Definition of the situationThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute. HDFS 135 1st EditionHow we perceive the situation will determine how we respondGoes on constantly in social situationsSymbols help define the situationShared history will help defineRelationship disputes may often be over the definition of the situationRoles1. Roles: shared norms about how people should actThey are systems of meaning that enable occupants & others with whom they interact to anticipate future behaviorsFamilies are comprised of positions with rolesRoles specify expectations about the proper extent, direction & duration of feelings & emotions. (ex. Parenthood)2. Roles are better understood in relation to counter-roles. (ex. Husband/wife, parent/child)3. Roles can be formal (father, sister, teacher) or informal (best friend, lover)Content of both can be negotiated but more room with informal roles4.Roles are not static: they change over timepast experiences & events help give shape to the content of roles in the presentRole-taking vs. Role-making1.role-taking: the ability to mentally put yourself in the role of another and imaginehow things would look from the other person’s view2. Role-making: how roles are formed in the process of interaction; creating your own role and modifying (raising children)Criticism: concepts are difficult to defineToo much emphasis on individuals creating a


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