ISU POL 106 - Final Exam Study Guide (4 pages)

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Final Exam Study Guide



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POL 106 1st Edition Exam 3 Study Guide Lectures 13 19 Lecture 13 October 21 What is casework Legislative work on behalf of individual constituents to solve their problems with government agencies and programs What is partisanship What is hyperpartisanship Partisanship is the loyalty to a party that helps shape how members see the world how they define problems and how they identify appropriate solutions Hyperpartisanship is a commitment to a party so strong that it can transcend other commitments leading members to choose party over constituent or over the national interest What is reapportionment A reallocation of congressional seats among the states every ten years following the census What is redistricting What is gerrymandering Redistricting is the process of redrawing of district lines in states with more than one representative carried out by state legislators or commission Gerrymandering is redistricting to benefit a particular group What is a standing committee Permanent committees responsible for legislation in particular policy areas What is the house rules committee Determines how and when debate on a bill will take place no rules committee in the senate Which house has limitations for debates The House of Representatives Does the Senate have rules for debate about bills The senate has no limitations for debates about bills What is a filibuster How do you break them Senator s talk a bill to death to kill time and prevent it from passing It can be broken with a cloture vote of 60 or more senators Lecture 14 October 23 What is the double expectations gap The gap between presidential promises and powers of the office What is required to override a veto 2 3 majority vote in each house What is an executive order Clarification of congressional policy issued by the president and having the full force of law What is the President s role in the military He is the commander and chief as the civilian head of military Lecture 15 October 28 What is the President s cabinet The members chosen by the President and approved by the Senate head the executive departments What is the executive office of the president EOP The President s closest staff It is designed to serve the President s interests and exert control over the executive branch What is the role of the VP He has little real power used to break ties in the Senate and can t die in case something happens to the President Lecture 16 October 30 What is judicial review Which case established this Judicial review is the ability of the judicial branch to review the actions of the other two branches Marbury v Madison established this What is the difference between judicial activism and judicial restraint The idea of judicial activism is when the court has to get involved in as many things as they can whereas the idea of judicial restraint is when the court does not hear any case unless it is absolutely necessary What are amicus curiae briefs Amicus curiae means friend of the court and it is when an interest group writes a letter to the Supreme Court in order to persuade them to hear a case How do court cases get heard in the Supreme Court 4 of the 9 Supreme Court justices have to agree to hear it Rule of 4 What is stare decisis It sets a precedent for future cases regarding a previous ruling in a similar case Lecture 18 November 6 What are interest groups An organization of individuals who share a common political goal and are united for the purpose of influencing government decisions What is a PAC A political action committee the fundraising arm of an interest group Lecture 19 November 11 What is voter mobilization Getting constituents out to vote What is prospective voting vs retrospective voting Prospective voting is basing voting decisions on well informed opinions and consideration of the future consequences of a given vote whereas retrospective voting is basing voting decisions on reactions to past performance approving the status quo or signaling a desire for change What is the difference between a primary and caucus A primary is an election by which voters choose convention delegates committed to voting for a certain candidate whereas a caucus is a local gathering of party members to choose convention delegates What is a wedge issue A controversial issue that one party uses to split the voters in the other party What is a front loading primary The process of scheduling presidential primaries early in the primary season What is the minimum amount of electoral votes a candidate needs to become President 270 electoral votes


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