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UNC-Chapel Hill GEOG 111 - Cyclone Tracks cont'd

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GEOG 111 1st Edition Lecture 29 Outline of Last Lecture I. Types of weather around wave cyclonesII. Stages of developmentIII. Cyclone tracksOutline of Current Lecture I. Types of weather around wave cyclonesII. Cyclone tracksa. The Alberta Clipperb. Texas-Great Lakesc. The Gulf-Atlantic CoastIII. Frozen precipitationa. Typesb. Weather setupCurrent LectureI. Cyclone tracks (cont’d)a. The Alberta Clipperi. Form most often in Alberta region of Canadaii. Fast movingiii. Produce light precipitation near trackiv. Far away from bodies of water  relatively dry systemv. NC generally on warm, dry side of cyclonevi. Don’t have a chance to capture Gulf or Atlantic moisturevii. Common during winter1. Generally an artic high will push in behind the clipperb. Texas-Great Lakesi. Bit slowerii. Center is closer to the Gulf of Mexico  draws much moisture north from the Gulf1. Water vapor rises  condensation (cumulonimbus clouds)2. Heavy precipitation/higher rates along and North of the trackiii. Stronger they are and the more slowly they move, the wetter they will beiv. Severe thunderstorms can occur south of the track1. Possibly hail, strong windsv. Air is getting colder aloft (trough is approaching from the West)1. Atmosphere is destabilizing c. The Gulf-Atlantic Coasti. Heavy precipitation along and north of the track1. Produces the heaviest precipitation in our areaThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.ii. Not as quick as Alberta Clipperiii. Large amounts of water vapor because it hugs the coastiv. NC remains in cool sector and could receive frozen precipitationII. Frozen precipitationa. Typesi. Freezing rain- cold rain, hits the surface and then freezesii. Sleet- pellets of ice1. Not nearly as dangerous as freezing raina. Can get some traction on sleetb. Always bounce off surfaceb. Weather setupi. Air gradually lifts up over cold air1. Relatively warmer air above cold wedgeii. Rain  freezing rain  sleet  snowiii. Thickness of wedge determines type of precipitation1. Warmer, thicker nose  freezing rain2. Thinner nose  sleetc. Temperature profile of freezing


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