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ECU CMGT 2200 - CMGT 2200 ch10

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Project Planning and SchedulingConstruction ScheduleSchedule ObjectivesScheduling UsesThe Critical Path MethodDiagramming formatsSlide 7Key questions to ask when establishing sequenceCPM job calculationsDefinitionsCalculation StepsSlide 12Slide 13Slide 14Slide 15How to Plan a Project?Basic IdeaBreaking The Job Down Into ActivitiesActivity typesActivity TypesSystem for DescriptionSeparating the ActivitiesThe Concept of Level of DetailTips on Activity List DevelopmentPlanning the Sequence of WorkPriority of RelationshipsDevelopment of the Overall Logic DiagramTips for Establishing Work SequencesEstimating Duration TimesRules for Estimating DurationsAdjustment of Calculated Times (cont.)Adjustment of Calculated TimesCalculations of Activity DurationsDerivation Typical Means LineDurations Using the BCCDGoals of the Project Calculation ProcedureCalculating Overall Job DurationAdvanced CalculationsHow to Communicate Schedule Info?QuestionsMonitoring And Controlling The ProjectThe Monitoring ProcessMonitoring ProgressSteps in UpdatingHow Often to Update??Updating the Individual ActivitiesWhere to Find Progress InformationComparing Progress to GoalsAnalyzing Job StatusWhat to look for in project reportsTaking corrective actionThe Key Element of CommunicationConstruction Project ManagementConstruction Project ManagementFourth EditionFourth EditionConstruction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights ReservedProject Planning and SchedulingChapter 10The organization and content of this presentation is based on a scheduling seminar one of the authors teaches for the R.S. Means Company. David Pierce, Southern Polytechnic University and a consultant to R.S. Means, was the principal author of this seminar.Construction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights ReservedConstruction ScheduleSeries of tasks or activities Arranged in a logical orderDepicting a start timeShowing activity durationsIndicating a completion timeConstruction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights ReservedSchedule ObjectivesDetermine Project Completion TimeDetermine Critical ActivitiesIdentify which activities can be delayedUse as a tool to manage a projectConstruction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights ReservedScheduling UsesOwner program planning“What if” AnalysisProject CoordinationAnalyze and document project changesResource ManagementProject Reporting and MonitoringConstruction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights ReservedThe Critical Path MethodBreak a job down into manageable/small partsAnalyze each part for time and resourcesString them together in sequenceConstruction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights ReservedDiagramming formatsHow to indicate logic/ sequence/order of the workConstruction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights ReservedLogic ProblemsDemo DiagramsActivity B cannot start until activity A is completedActivity A must be complete before B and C can startA BABCC cannot start until A and B are completed.C cannot start until A and B are completed, and D, E, and F cannot start until C is completed.ABCABC EFDB follows AC runs concurrent with A and BD follows B and CA BCDConstruction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights ReservedKey questions to ask when establishing sequenceWhat must go before the activity?What must go after the activity?What can go on at the same time as the activity?Construction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights ReservedCPM job calculationsGoals of the calculation procedureTo find starting times for all activitiesTo find overall job durationTo find critical activitiesConstruction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights ReservedDefinitionsEarly Start (ES)Early Finish (EF)Late Start (LS)Late Finish (LF)Total FloatConstruction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights ReservedCalculation StepsForward PassEarly TimesBackward PassLate TimesFind Float TimesConstruction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights Reserved2A3B3D1M2F4C5H4J3L2K5E5GNetwork Problem 1Construction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights Reserved2A3B3D1M2F4C5H4J3L2K5E5G0 20 22 52 55 105 105 87 105 98 129 1112 1415 1915 1911 1614 1919 2219 2210 1510 1515 1717 1922 2322 230 0 23 3 30 0 000 2Network Solution 1Construction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights Reserved2A6B5D1M5F4C3H7J2L5K6E8GNetwork Problem 2Construction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights Reserved2A6B5D1M5F4C3H7J2L5K6E8G0 20 231 3231 3229 3129 31022 2922 29022 2526 29422 2724 29213 1821 2688 1217 21914 2214 2202 82 808 148 1408 139 141Network Solution 2Construction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights ReservedHow to Plan a Project?Review historical dataReview ContractReview Drawings and SpecsCommunicateConstruction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights ReservedBasic IdeaBreak the job down into its component partsFigure out how long each part should takeDecide the sequence of constructionFigure out how long the job as a whole should takeConstruction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights ReservedBreaking The Job Down Into ActivitiesSmall/manageable partsIndividual tasks must add up to the whole20/80 ruleConstruction Project Management, 4/eFrederick Gould, Nancy JoyceCopyright © 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc.All Rights


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