New version page

UIUC RST 100 - Chapter 1 - Meanings from History

This preview shows page 1-2 out of 5 pages.

View Full Document
View Full Document

End of preview. Want to read all 5 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a GradeBuddy member to access this document.

View Full Document
Unformatted text preview:

RST 100 1st Edition Lecture 6Outline of Last Lecture I. Optimal Level of ArousalII. Sensation Seeking TheoryIII. Reversal TheoryIV. Self-as-EntertainmentV. Anti-StructureOutline of Current Lecture I. Outline – Review of leisure during historyII. Ancient Egyptian PeriodIII. Greek PeriodIV. Roman PeriodV. Middle Ages Current LectureHistorical Review of Leisure - In order to fully understand leisure today, we need to understand its historical context - How has the meaning of leisure changed?- How was leisure been used?- What are consistent themes?I clicker – pursuit of scholarship was considered the most ideal version of leisureAncient Egypt- Competitions popular- Leisure activities based on social class o Also prevalent today- Music, drama, dance flourished – orchestras gave elaborate performances These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.- Bullfights and gymnastic exhibitionso Bodily competition and activities associated to animals - Slaves played a big role in entertainment and leisure o Taught to play instruments, juggle, participate in the competitions - Chess, checkers, backgammon (started during this period of time)- Drinking and gambling popular activities - Feasts were commono Eat until couldn’t eat anymore and then vomit it out to eat more food afterAncient Greece- Leisure had an important role in society- “Ideal Leisure” (I-clicker question) – pursuit of scholarship: reading, thinking, debating, discussing, studying- Term for leisure – schole: to use free tie wisely for oneself, being occupied in something desirable for its own sake) music, poetry, debate, inquiry, physical activity)- Symospiums – drinking games with dice – entertained also by acrobats and musicians (typically among the upper class)- Viewed leisure as the “ultimate purpose of life” – there was no loftier pursuit- Work defined as “the state of being unleisurly”- Slave class supported leisure class o About 1/3 of population- Society divided between those who were free and those who were slaves o School would be considered ideal leisure during the Ancient Greek times - Most leisure opportunities were reserved for rich, free men onlyo Women were meant to be behind closed doors- Slaves supported the leisure class, women considered “lesser beings,” and the poor were occupied with survival - Thus, small minority of population enjoyed “ideal leisure”Plato - Plato = leisure was freedom for engagement with culture- These qualities were what was needed for political leisure Aristotle- Leisure is time free from the necessity of work, the highest human activity- Proposed a leisure class be supported by the underclass in order to assure a wise and just government - Leisure is free time to govern and to prepare to govern Olympics- First 13 Olympics involved a foot race of about 180 meters- Began as a religious celebration to Zeus – a religious event - Women were not supposed to view the event, except Priestess of Demeter - Crowned in Olive Wreath – local heroes who would be looked after by their community - Different countries that were at war with eachother, they had to state that they would put aside their differences - Later horse races, lifting weights, boxing, javelin, discuss, wrestling, long jump- In 393 AD the Emperor ordered the games ended (because of decline in interest and quality) – Theodosius I - Peirre du Cobertin - French man who revived the Olympics o Participants just wanted money- No games held for over 1000 years- Some indication for Olympic games for UNMARRIED womeno Much less is known about this event Ancient Rome- Romans adopted many of the activities of Ancient Greece- But civilizations were very differed- In the beginning, a little free time, but later wealth and free time increases- Used a slave class to tend to their personal pleasures – self-indulgencies and hedonistic ways - The normal practices were to be entertained, to exercise, bathe, eat and drink o NOT SCHOLARSHIP unlike Greece- Body fixation – physical activity and fitness important o Oils, Jewelry, Piercings, Baths - Over 800 public baths in Rome – hot rooms, cold rooms, swimming baths, tracks, ball courts, libraries, also parks, sport arenas, play fields - Political threat of mass uprising was concern to the rulerso Fear of slave uprising due to small elite- Mass Leisure – used to quiet nonproductive masses- Leisure used as a form of social control o Keep the lower classes entertained Bread and Circuses- Social control- Holidays prevalent – 175 by 354 AD o Different sporting competitions etc, all to keep people happy- Sports emphasized human combat, often ending in death o Import different types of animals and beasts to competeo Bloody and violent - Large arenas – holding up to 385,000 people o People would stand – not sit - Sea Battles – staged outside Rome in lakeo Included battle 30-50 ships, it is recorded that 19,000 boarded ships and 3000 died in one day - Prostitution and gambling were licensed by state- Drugs and alcohol societal problem- The working day towards the end of the empire began at day break and ended by noon o People had a lot of free time on their hando Some historians claim that some people didn’t know how to handle their massive amount of leisure Middle Ages- Life was difficult – war, disease, and famine kept population small- Average lifespan – 30 years- Catholic church eventually became the main civilizing force- Christians condemned hedonistic wars of life- Salvation was through self-deprivationo Deprive oneself from pleasure- Many forms of pleasure were seen as evil - Many aspects of the Roman life were forbidden- Stadiums, amphitheaters, and baths were destroyed- Passive spectatorship of bloody sports was viewed unfavorably - Dignity of labor was stressed - “Idleness is the great enemy of the soul” – need to keep people busy - Emergence of the work ethic o Still prevalent todayo Keep people busy – kids, college students- Manual labor and sacred readings were encouraged - People did play despite the church’s power and rules- Leisure depended on one’s classo Nobleman – upper class Riding and hunting Hunting preserves established for the wealthy  Mock fighting between knights  Games Entertained in their castles – minstrels, acrobats, jugglers, storytellers Social drinking and


View Full Document
Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view Chapter 1 - Meanings from History and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view Chapter 1 - Meanings from History and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?