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UD MEEG 304 - mage preparation for reducing the overall size in your final PDFs

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Image preparation for reducing the overall size in your final PDFs The first step for reducing overall file size is to trim the fat from the images you plan on using before you place them into your larger composition in Word, PowerPoint, etc. One space-saving practice is to create images at the proper size for the intended use. For instance: images going into PowerPoint for desktop and web presentations need only be screen resolution, 72 dots per inch. In this case reduce a 300 dpi image down to 72 dpi before importing. If the image is going to be accompanied by text on the slide, the image should not take up the full dimensions of the slide. To fit the image on the page with text, you will be forced to scale the image within PowerPoint. This will make the overall project unnecessarily large. Know your image dimensions needs before importing the image into PowerPoint. Scale the image in your image editor as needed, before importing into your projects. Another way to save space is to select only the portions of drawing that contains the image in the preview window when scanning. Take your time in the scan preview window to select only the portion of the image needed for your document. Do not scan the unnecessary blank areas or white spaces. Questions to ask before scanning images: 1. How will this image be used? Will you use it for multiple purposes? Print, web, PowerPoint screen display? 2. Do you really need all that extra white space included around the focal point of your image? 3. Is your image very small or very large? Does it need to be enlarged/reduced before going into the final composition? 4. Is the image a photo or line drawing? Archival Image – This is the image that you want to keep forever. It is the image that you go back to when repurposing the same image for other uses, such as PowerPoint, web, etc. Reduce size for project – Modify the image for the job at hand. Reduce size and resolution of the large archive image, before placing in it PowerPoint or your web page. JPEG and Compression – JPG is a compressed file format and can be opened in most programs. They can be millions of colors and any resolution (72dpi, 150dpi, 300dpi, etc.). The amount of compression applied, in most programs, is user defined. The more compression applied to the image, the more information is tossed out. Image quality degrades and the image becomes more pixilated. Images that are highly compressed will not print as well as lesser-compressed image, even though they may be higher resolution (a greater number of pixels dpi). If the program you use has an automated process for saving JPGs, be sure that it doesn’t reduce your resolution to less than 150 dpi if the image is intended for printing purposes. Also be sure that the compression allows for a higher quality setting, so the images keep from getting pixilated. GIF – GIF images are very poor quality and should never be used for images intended for printing. Images can only contain a maximum of 256 colors and 72 dpi. This file format was created for web images. It’s best used for web buttons and banners containing simple limited colored graphics. It should be avoided if the image contains people, artwork, and any image that needs details represented. Again, never use the GIF format for important images that will be used for printing.Steps for scanning 1. Lay the image on the scan bed – click the preview button 2. Select the portion of the preview to be scanned. Do NOT select unnecessary background areas. 3. Set desired output size and resolution. If your image needs to be enlarged or reduced set it now. Archival images should be 300 dpi. A good target size for images going into PDFs for printing is about 6 or 7 inches wide/high. No measurements should go over 7 inches in any direction. 4. Hit the Scan button – save your file as TIF or Photoshop doc. DO NOT save as a JPG or GIF. These are compressed file formats and will instantly degrade your archival image. Reducing scanned images 1. Open an archival image in a graphics program such as Photoshop or PaintShop Pro. 2. Crop out the unnecessary portions of the image, with the cropping tool. 3. Adjust Levels, and overall brightness and contrast, as needed 4. Change DPI resolution of the image to 150 dpi for printing, or 72 for PowerPoint and Web pages. At the same time adjust the dimensions of the image. Remember to keep it no larger than 7 inches for printing. Remember the smaller the image the smaller the final PDF. 5. Convert Black and White RGB images to Gray Scale 6. Sharpen a little as needed using Unsharp Mask. 7. Save a copy using the “Save As“ JPG with low compression setting, between 8 –10 8. Import into your program of choice Reducing images made in Cad and Spread Sheet programs 1. Import the image into PhotoShop or Paintshop Pro 2. Crop out the unnecessary portions of the image, with the cropping tool. 3. Adjust Levels and overall brightness and contrast as needed 4. Resize the image to 150 dpi for printing, or 72 for PowerPoint and Web pages. At the same time change the overall image size to fix comfortably on an 8x10 piece of paper. Images should be about 6 or 7 inches at its largest dimension. 5. Convert black and white RGB images to Gray Scale 6. Sharpen a little as needed using Unsharp Mask 7. Save a copy of the image using the “Save as” JPG with low compression setting between 8 –10 8. Import into your program of


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