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HIST 315 1st Edition Lecture 2Outline of Last Lecture I. Syllabus ReviewOutline of Current Lecture I. AudiotopiaII. The WeaversIII. Los Tigres del NorteCurrent LectureAudiotopia: a musical utopia a listener can enter and be transformed into-Our associations with songs are our own experiences rather than their originsMusicking: the entire process and context of a performance that involves everyone and everything that a performance touches, from the roadies to the record execs to the musicians to the audience -The overall process of music more than just a singer and a song-An invitation to think of the broad process of ideals that goes along with a song Main point: think about the way that listening to sounds can create a physical place for yourself 1. The place of music in American cultural lifea. More than simply the physical places where music is created or consumed but its power to connect associations and memories with songs2. Music as a "connection, a ticket, a pass, an invitation, a node in a complex network" 3. Music as social protest and a "cultural text" Keywords: (will appear on midterms and finals; construct a definition, explore the cultural significance of the term) AudiotopiaThe WeaversLos Tigres Del Norte Accessing notions of who an American is -> The Weavers & Los Tigres del Norte-Deemed un-American The Weavers: These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.-Author (Josh Kun) listened to them because his parents who were "quietly democratic" -White musicians, they were politically radically leftist, most famous in 1951-"Tzena Tzena Tzena" supports the "New Nation of Israel" -> un-American in that it's respectful of another culture; potentially fearful for many Americans-Unexpected in its' success; enormously popular for a very short period of time-Attacked by anti-communist motivations (House on American Activities) in America because of their multi-cultural nature, saw danger in the incorporation of other cultures-Censorship via blacklisting eradicates their music from listeners grasp -How did "Goodnight Irene" come across as un-American? oOriginally recorded by Lead Belly (black) who performed it as a prison ballad, one of the first nationally recognized folk musicians, discovered in a penitentiary, performed in jail clothes, performed for workers unions -> met and played with Pete Seeger (The Weavers) shortly before he died Lost Tigres Del Norte-Use their music as a vehicle for social commentary -Began as undocumented immigrants making music, won a Grammy as the first undocumented music group-Articulate a conflicted belonging; "Mis dos Patrias" with Hispanic heritage and American citizenship-Pushes the envelope of American identity in American music-Made their music popular on their own without the support of the prominent record companies "This is not America's Flag" Images by Alfredo Jaar-America is more than just the United States, how do we define America? The Americas? The United States of America? "A Stranger among Sounds" -Kafka's dog, enters into a world of other dogs but realizes it can't communicate with any other dogs, has to realize how to socialize with other dogs-Argues that popular music can be a tool to understand nationalism for those who aren't represented-Diving deeper into the archives of music exposes significant


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