GSU NEUR 3000 - NEUR 3000 - Chapter 16 (26 pages)

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NEUR 3000 - Chapter 16



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NEUR 3000 - Chapter 16

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Pages:
26
School:
Georgia State University
Course:
Neur 3000 - Hon Principles of Neuroscience

Unformatted text preview:

MOTIVATION NEUR 3000 Dr Joseph J Normandin WHAT IS MOTIVATION Voluntary actions are produced to satisfy a need This need can be abstract I need to go hiking in a Massachusetts forest Here the motivation is hard to describe This need can be concrete I need to eat Here the motivation is easy to describe I feel hungry Motivation drives behavior in a way that a particular behavior is more likely to occur We have yet to develop a full concept of why we might want to go hiking but we do have an understanding of many of the motivations necessary for survival THE HYPOTHALAMUS HOMEOSTASIS MOTIVATED BEHAVIOR Recall that the hypothalamus has been described as a regulator of homeostasis In a sense the basic needs for survival body temperature fluid balance energy balance Hypothalamic regulation begins with sensory transduction A regulated parameter must be measured by sensory neurons e g temperature Periventricular hypothalamic neurons detect that this is outside the normal range Hypothalamic neurons then orchestrate the body s response Humoral response stimulating or inhibiting pituitary hormone release into the blood LONG TERM REGULATION OF FEEDING BEHAVIOR The brain needs energy in the form of glucose as much as it needs oxygen A few minutes of glucose deprivation leads to unconsciousness Because food availability is not assured the body has evolved a number of mechanisms to store energy and use it when needed We have also evolved the motivated behavior to seek out food to keep our energy stores full LONG TERM REGULATION OF FEEDING BEHAVIOR LONG TERM REGULATION OF FEEDING BEHAVIOR LONG TERM REGULATION OF FEEDING BEHAVIOR The lipostatic hypothesis The brain monitors amounts of body fat and acts to maintain body fat LONG TERM REGULATION OF FEEDING BEHAVIOR The lipostatic hypothesis The brain monitors amounts of body fat and acts to maintain body fat In order for this to occur there must be some communication between body fat and the brain LONG TERM REGULATION OF FEEDING



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