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MCCCD SOC 101 - Syllabus

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Glendale Community College Sociology 101: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY Monday – Wednesday 10:00-11:15am/ Section 34569 INSTRUCTOR / HOW TO CONTACT ME: Eileen Johnston, M. A. 623-845-3280 [email protected] Office Hours: Monday/Wednesday: GCCN 8:15-8:45am/12:30-12:50pm (9/24-10/19) (05-110) GCC Main GCCN 1130am-12:20pm (10/21-12/9) Tuesday/Thursday: 2:30 - 3:20pm Other times/days: By appointment TEACHING PHILOSOPHY/METHOD: In class, we will learn with a combination of lecture and student participation and discussion. Out of class, you will have access to GCC's technology resources for both research and completing assignments. Lessons are based on the text and other resources. Students are expected to read chapters prior to class to facilitate class discussions. Since lectures, readings and discussions are designed to complement one another, your attendance and active participation are critical. TEXT: SOC 2009 Edition, by Jon Witt. (REQUIRED*) OFFICIAL COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to Sociology (SOC 101): Fundamental concepts of social organization, culture, socialization, social institutions and social change. OFFICIAL COURSE COMPETENCIES: By the end of the semester you will have a good general knowledge of the elements of sociology in contemporary society. There are a number of specific components of this general knowledge. You will be able to: 1. Define sociology and explain how it differs from other social sciences. 2. Explain the sociological imagination and how it operates in everyday life. 3. Describe the basic theoretical perspectives sociologists use to analyze social phenomenon. 4. Name and briefly describe the importance of selected major theorists in the field of sociology. 5. List and explain the stages in a basic research design. 6. Describe and differentiate between qualitative and quantitative research methods. 7. Define the basic sociological concepts: culture, society, socialization, social structure, groups and institutions. 8. Describe values and norms, including mores, folkways and laws. 9. Describe societal and structural factors that can influence individual behavior. 10. Describe sociological/psychological theories as they relate to the development of self. 11. Describe the influence of selected institutions on society and the individual. 12. Describe the effect of race/ethnicity, gender/sex, and age on social inequality. 13. Explain major sociological perspectives on social class. 14. Explain how conflict, functionalist, and symbolic interactionist theoretical perspectives view deviance and conformity. 15. Describe and explain social change, including the influence of collective behavior, social movements and demographic factors. 1 of 6IMPORTANT DATES: September 7, 2009 Labor Day Nov 11, 2009 Veteran’s Day Nov 18, 2009 Who Am I? paper due Nov 25, 2009 Stratification paper due November 26-29, 2009 Thanksgiving December 14, 2009 Final Exam 10am COURSE OUTLINE: Progress of our class may affect the course calendar, but I will give you specific dates and reading assignments for each unit. I. Section 1: Basic Foundations Chapters: 1, 2, and sections of 15 II. Section 2: Social Stratification Chapters: 10, 11, 12, 13, III. Section 3: Society and Social Institutions Chapters: 3, 4, 5, 6 IV. Other chapters/sections are incorporated throughout the course. CLASS ATMOSPHERE: Learning should be fun and involve all class members. Toward that goal, all of us will respect the following guidelines, especially important given the nature of this course: 1. Courtesy and Feedback. a. Everyone is entitled to opinions that are supportable and honest, and these opinions MUST be respected by each of us. You may question what is being said; however, at no time, will you attack the person. We will discuss appropriate feedback early in the semester. You will have an opportunity to present your perspective. b. Only one person should be talking at one time; more than one person speaking at a time is disconcerting and disrespectful. “Side-bars” (individual comments/discussions, while someone has the “floor”) will not be tolerated. I understand there will be times when you want to discuss the topic at hand with another class member; however, it is inappropriate behavior. Each student will be afforded an opportunity to present his/her comments/opinions. Therefore, please give the current speaker the same courtesies you desire when it is your turn to speak. c. Please raise your hand, when you wish to speak. I will call on students in the order in which I see hands. d. Please keep the above courtesies in mind throughout the semester. 2. Electronic Courtesy. Please be considerate of your classmates and the instructor; it is quite disturbing to have an electronic device activate during class. Please have all electronic devices turned-off or placed in the vibrate mode, and stored in a book bag, purse, or other location where the item cannot be seen, during class. Repeated violations may result in the student being required to leave class and receive an unexcused absence for that class. (See me if there are extenuating/emergency situations that may, on an exceptional basis, necessitate you needing to leave a specific device on.) 2 of 63. During class, please refrain from engaging in the following, or similar activities: a. Sharpening pencils. b. Disposing of trash. c. Eating and gum chewing. d. Putting on make-up, combing hair, etc. e. Sleeping, reading or doing other unrelated class activities. ATTENDANCE POLICY: I recognize that you have multiple responsibilities in your life; consequently, I do not put you in a position of justifying a class absence. However, because there is no alternate means for securing much of the information presented in class, a basic requirement is to come to class. Because you need to be present to learn the concepts introduced in this course (and for me to certify you have mastered the materials), attendance and class participation influence your final grade. Absences 1. General Absences. A combined total of three (3) hours of class (leaving early or missing entire classes) from unexcused absences, may be accrued without penalty. Points will be deducted at a rate of two (2) points per unexcused absence after that. Excessive absences may result in


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