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United Nations S/RES/2567 (2021) Security Council Distr.: General 12 March 2021 21-03440 (E) *2103440* Resolution 2567 (2021) Adopted by the Security Council on 12 March 2021 The Security Council, Recalling its previous resolutions, statements of its President, and press statements concerning the situation in South Sudan, Reaffirming its strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity, and national unity of the Republic of South Sudan, and recalling the importance of the principles of non-interference, good-neighbourliness, and regional cooperation, Affirming its support for the 2018 “Revitalised Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in the Republic of South Sudan” (the Revitalised Agreement), Stressing that the peace process only remains viable with the full commitment by all parties, welcoming in this regard encouraging developments in South Sudan’s peace process, and demonstrations of political will by the parties to the Revitalised Agreement in order to create the conditions necessary to advance the peace process, including agreement on the appointment of governors and other progress in the formation of state and local government structures, Recognizing the reduction in violence between signatory parties to the Revitalised Agreement, and that the permanent ceasefire was upheld in most parts of the country, Expressing appreciation for the leadership of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) in advancing the peace process for South Sudan and welcoming the commitment and efforts of IGAD and its member states, the Reconstituted Joint Monitoring and Evaluation Commission (RJMEC), the African Union (AU), the African Union Peace and Security Council (AUPSC), the United Nations (UN), and countries in the region to continue engaging with South Sudanese leaders to address the current crisis, and encouraging their continued and proactive engagement, Welcoming the ongoing facilitation of political dialogue by the Community of Sant’Egidio between signatories and non-signatories of the Revitalised Agreement and encouraging all parties to continue their efforts to peacefully resolve disputes in order to achieve an inclusive and sustainable peace, Reiterating its alarm and deep concern regarding the political, security, economic, and humanitarian crisis in South Sudan, taking note of the impact of theS/RES/2567 (2021) 21-03440 2/13 COVID-19 pandemic, and emphasizing there can be no military solution to the situation in South Sudan, Expressing concern regarding the delays in implementing the Revitalised Agreement and stressing the need to expeditiously finalize security arrangements, establish all institutions of the Revitalised Transitional Government of National Unity, including the national legislative assembly, and make progress on transitional reforms, Strongly condemning all fighting, including violence and casualties that resulted from recent defections, and other violations of the 21 December 2017 “Agreement on Cessation of Hostilities, Protection of Civilians, and Humanitarian Access” (the ACOH) and the permanent ceasefire provisions of the Revitalised Agreement, welcoming the rapid assessment of violations by the Ceasefire and Transitional Security Arrangements Monitoring and Verification Mechanism (CTSAMVM), encouraging IGAD to share reports with the Security Council rapidly, and noting that the African Union, IGAD, and the United Nations Security Council demanded that parties that violate the ACOH must be held accountable, Expressing grave concern regarding increased violence between armed groups in some parts of South Sudan, which has killed and displaced thousands, and condemning the mobilization of such groups by parties to the conflict, including by members of government forces and armed opposition groups, Expressing grave concern at ongoing reports of sexual and gender-based violence, including the findings of the report of the Secretary-General on Conflict-Related Sexual Violence to the Security Council (S/2020/487) of the use of sexual violence as a tactic by parties to the conflict against the civilian population in South Sudan, including use of rape, sexual slavery and sexual torture for the purpose of intimidation and punishment, based on perceived political affiliation, and employed as part of a strategy targeting members of ethnic groups, and where conflict-related sexual violence and other forms of violence against women and girls has persisted after the signing of the Revitalised Agreement, as documented in the May 2020 report published by the United Nations Mission in the Republic of South Sudan (UNMISS) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) on “Access to Health for Survivors of Conflict-Related Sexual Violence in South Sudan”, noting that some progress was observed by South Sudanese parties through implementation of action plans to address sexual violence in conflict, and underlining the urgency and importance of timely investigations to support accountability and the provision of assistance and protection to survivors and victims of sexual and gender-based violence, Alarmed by the dire humanitarian situation, the high levels of food insecurity in the country and likely famine in some areas, recalling its resolution 2417 (2018) that recognizes the need to break the vicious cycle between armed conflict and food insecurity, condemning attacks on the means of livelihood and intentional denial of access to food, which could amount to war crimes, further condemning the obstructions by all parties to civilians’ movement and to humanitarian actors’ movement to reach civilians in need of assistance, expressing concern at the imposition of taxes and fees which hamper the delivery of humanitarian assistance across the country, noting with concern reports that forced displacement and denial of humanitarian access is exacerbating food insecurity for the civilian population, Expressing serious and urgent concern over the nearly 3.8 million displaced persons and ongoing humanitarian crisis, 8.3


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