UMass Amherst KIN 430 - BiomechLabF (6 pages)

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BiomechLabF



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BiomechLabF

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Pages:
6
School:
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Course:
Kin 430 - Biomechanics

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Biomechanics Laboratory F Impulse Momentum in Vertical Jumping Objectives To better understand the impulse momentum relationship Learn to use force platform data to compare two jumping techniques Introduction Determining the height of a jump in the field is often done using the jump and reach method either with a fancy measuring device as seen in the figure above or by placing chalk on the fingertips and making marks on a wall These techniques may be sufficient to monitor progress in an athlete s jumping ability but they don t provide a precise measure of jump height The height of a jump more specifically the vertical displacement of the center of mass may be determined more accurately in the laboratory using a force platform Thus the purpose of this laboratory is to learn how data from a force platform can be used to analyze jump height and to use these techniques to compare jump heights in countermovement jumps CMJ and squat jumps SJ Figure 1 Figure 1 a A stick figure drawing of a countermovement jump with the center of mass shown for movement comparison with b the representation of the squat jump Linthorne 2001 As we know the center of mass of the human body will act as a projectile while airborne Thus if the vertical take off velocity for a jump is known the vertical displacement of the jump i e jump height can be determined using equations of constant acceleration If we know the forces acting on the body in the vertical direction and the velocity at the start of the jump zero if the person is standing still we can use the impulse momentum relationship to determine the take off velocity There is also a simpler way to use force platform data to determine takeoff velocity The total time in the air is equal to the period of time when the vertical ground reaction force GRF is zero i e from takeoff to landing If we assume that the person took off and landed with the same body posture is this a reasonable assumption then the vertical takeoff velocity can be determined



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