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URI HDF 201 - Gender Identity

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HDF 201 1st Edition Lecture 4Outline of Last Lecture I. AdulthoodII. Choosing a CareerIII. Boomerang GenerationIV. Autonomy from Parentsa. DifferentiationV. Gender Identitya. Archetypeb. Transgenderc. TranssexualsOutline of Current Lecture I. Gender Identitya. Gender Typicalityb. Genderc. SexII. Internalized Moralitya. Lawrence Kohlberg’s Stages of Moral DevelopmentCurrent LectureI. Gender Identity – Biological vs. Psychological vs. SocietalGender Identity is when someone considers themselves to be primarily masculine, primarily feminine, or some of both – people usually have this figured out by late adolescence. a. Gender Typicality is what society typically expects of a male or femaleThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.b. Gender is characteristic qualities and social roles of a male or female (sociological)c. Sex is the biological, chromosomal determination of being male (XY) or female (XX) (Biological)Younger adolescents had a rigid and stereotyped understanding of gender, causing them to typically participate in more gender stereotyped behaviors than older adolescents. Teens perform stereotype, gender-specific behaviors in an effort to be attractive to the opposite sex (for example: females wear perfume, males workout to be more muscular). Friends and family influence how teens express their gender – stereotypical behaviors are passed down from each generation. By late adolescence, youths’ gender identity typically becomes more subtle, but without rigidity. At this point youth feel confident and secure enough to enjoy activities that interest them regardless of whether or not these activities are traditionally associated with their gender. Also by late adolescence, youth have usually figured out their own role in society, including their gender role, and they have established a secure and comfortable individual identity that corresponds to their values, beliefs, and interests.II. Internalized MoralityHillel the Elder said “What is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow.”a. Lawrence Kohlberg – Stages of Moral Development1. Obedience and Punishment Orientation- How can I avoid punishment?2. Self Interest Orientation- What’s in it for me?3. Interpersonal Accord and Conformity- Social norms- The good boy/good girl attitude4. Authority and Social-Order Maintaining Orientation- Law and order morality- Reciprocity5. Social Contract Orientation- Need to get along with others- Peer pressure6. Universal Ethical Principles- Universally accepted values that keep the world


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