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CORNELL HD 3700 - Freud on Dreams

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HD 3700 1st Edition Lecture 3 Outline of Last Lecture I. Freud’s Time and Place: Fin de Siecle ViennaII. Freud’s Intellectual Contexta. The rise of the scientific methodb. Marx, Darwin, Helmholtz and FreudIII. Freud’s Story: treating the “untreatable” patientsIV. “Parapraxes” – slips of the tongue and why they were so important to Freud’s researchOutline of Current Lecture I. Implications of Freud’s model of the associative mind for dreamsII. What are dreams?III. How do you find out what a dream really means?a. Freud’s 3 rules on associating to dreamsb. Have the dreamer interpret the dreamCurrent LectureWhat are dreams?- Every dream is disguised wish fulfillment- We are asleep during them- The consciousness in dreams is qualitatively different from that of waking lifeo There are no rules in dreamingo Dreams can be completely insane but still very realistico Dreaming is the mind at play with no rules—but not a mind at play without history—dreams are still you with your history- Dreams often incorporate internal and external stimuli—noise, stomach aches etc.- The variety of dreams is unlimited…from short snippets quickly forgotten to novelistic epics remembered throughout one’s lifeHow do you find out what a dream really means?- Simple: ask the dreamer - Freud’s 3 rules on associating to dreamso Do not worry about what the dream appears to tell us, whether it is absurd or intelligible, since it is not the unconscious meaning you’re searching for.o Associate to element of the dream without judging the associations … justkeep the ideas coming.o Keep associating until the connections between the dream materials and the underlying thoughts emerge.o Despite these rules, even the most willing patients find themselves stopping their associations, dismissing them as “irrelevant.” Or they say they “have no thoughts.” Ah, says Freud, so there’s some resistance to discovering the dream’s meaning.- Have the dreamer interpret his own dreamo He always says he doesn’t know what it means.o Ask the dreamer how he arrived at the dream, and his first remark is an explanation.o Encourage free association, asking the dreamer to keep the dream or dream element in mind as he does so.o Why does this work? Because all thoughts are connected with earlier thoughts. This is called psychic continuity.  This is why early childhood experiences are so important—child abuse has far reaching implications o A dream element often leads to a thought indirectly connected to


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