Berkeley ETHSTD 196 - Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Incidence of Lymphoma (13 pages)

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Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Incidence of Lymphoma



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Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Incidence of Lymphoma

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Pages:
13
School:
University of California, Berkeley
Course:
Ethstd 196 - Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis Documents

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Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Incidence of Lymphoma Lucy Brining Abstract Lymphoma is the fifth most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States and incidence levels are increasing with little new information on possible causes Several cancers are known to be associated with genetic aberrations This study investigates the relationship between developing lymphoma and genetic aberrations known as single nucleotide polymorphisms SNPs found in the MIF CY1PA APM1 and LEP genes SNPs are single nucleotide base changes within a gene whose presence is posited to interfere with the genes function The study tested whether the presence of one or more of the SNPs in question and the interactions between two SNPs increases the risk of developing lymphoma To investigate the hypothesis DNA was isolated from 1 236 controls and subjects with the subjects being cancer patients and analyzed for presence of the four SNPs using Real Time PCR analysis The data were tested for Hardy Weinburg equilibrium to determine normalcy of the data set and analyzed using chi squared analyses looking for associations between the presence of the SNPs and lymphoma Results are expected to show that the presence of two of the SNPs will have synergistic interactions and are associated with the development of lymphoma In addition the results might show the presence of at least one of the SNPs correlates with the development of lymphoma Findings from this study could serve as potential biomarkers for cancer in the future Introduction With only a five year survival rate of 52 in the US lymphomas are the fifth most common cancer affecting about 60 900 people a year Chang et al 2003 Despite diagnosis improvements and considerable efforts to identify possible risk factors the causes of most lymphoma cases are unknown and the incidence of lymphoma is increasing Chang et al 2003 Since 1970 the incidence of lymphoma has nearly doubled American Cancer Society 2002 With rates of lymphoma increasing and little



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