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UCF AMH 2010 - Antebellum Reform Movements

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Characteristics of Reform MovementsVarietyEvery problem has a reform movementFears that motivate reformersPopulation growth/ changes, growing quicklyGrowth of cities, urban areas; more crime, vice, and poverty.Politics. Officials who were appalled at Jackson as president.HopesSecond Great Awakening beliefs that you can become perfect.Change over time (3 stages of reform)Moral suasion (pre-1830)- first approach to reform. Willing to accept slow, gradual improvement over time.No compromise with win (post-1830)- get rid of all sin in your lifeLegal coercion (post-1850)TemperanceThe problemPeople drink a lot!!Alcohol was a part of everyday life.Early reform strategiesDrunkenness, not drinking is problematic (pre-1830)Dr. Rush’s Moral Thermometer (1790s)Later reform strategiesTotal abstinence (post-1830)The Drunkard’s Progress- from the first glass to the grave.The Pledge- total abstinence pledge, publicly to never drink again.Even later reform strategiesLegal prohibitionMaine Laws (1850s)PrisonsThe problemA lot of crime, associated with urbanization; riots.Caused by bad environments.Reform strategiesKeep criminals away from bad influencesTeach good character, repentanceExamplesEastern State Penitentiary (1829)The Tread Mill- invented for prison discipline.AbolitionThe problemSlavery legal, and growingNo one cares howeverReform strategiesColonization (1810 & ‘20s)- sending slaves back to Africa, creating coloniesNo compromise (1830s)Antebellum Reform Movements 10/27/2011Characteristics of Reform Movements- Variety- Every problem has a reform movement- Fears that motivate reformers- Population growth/ changes, growing quickly- Growth of cities, urban areas; more crime, vice, and poverty.- Politics. Officials who were appalled at Jackson as president.- Hopes- Second Great Awakening beliefs that you can become perfect.- Change over time (3 stages of reform)- Moral suasion (pre-1830)- first approach to reform. Willing to acceptslow, gradual improvement over time.- No compromise with win (post-1830)- get rid of all sin in your life- Legal coercion (post-1850)Temperance- The problem- People drink a lot!!- Alcohol was a part of everyday life.- Early reform strategies- Drunkenness, not drinking is problematic (pre-1830)o Dr. Rush’s Moral Thermometer (1790s)- Later reform strategies- Total abstinence (post-1830)- The Drunkard’s Progress- from the first glass to the grave.- The Pledge- total abstinence pledge, publicly to never drink again.- Even later reform strategies- Legal prohibitiono Maine Laws (1850s)10/27/2011Prisons- The problem- A lot of crime, associated with urbanization; riots.- Caused by bad environments.- Reform strategies- Keep criminals away from bad influences- Teach good character, repentance- Examples- Eastern State Penitentiary (1829)- The Tread Mill- invented for prison discipline.Abolition- The problem- Slavery legal, and growing- No one cares however- Reform strategies- Colonization (1810 & ‘20s)- sending slaves back to Africa, creating coloniesNo compromise


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