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FSU CCJ 3011 - Final Exam Study Guide

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CCJ3011ChiricosCriminology Final Exam Study Guide1. What are the 3 major schools of criminology?a. Classical, positive, and critical2. Schools of thought can be understood as an example of what?a. ideology3. Who knows something about the real world?a. The knowing subject4. What is the knowing subject rooted in? What do the roots produce?a. Particular, historically specific circumstancesb. Produce interests that may reflect real world5. Sensitivity to ideology makes us aware of what?a. Roots and consequences of real world6. How are ideas connected to real world?a. Ideas take the real world as objectb. Ideas have rootsc. Ideas have consequences7. What is ideology?a. Use of Reports about the real world that justify the Commands to do something in the real world of a public nature that will impact Interests that are rooted in particular Circumstances8. What is an example of ideology?a. Tuition: students- circumstance, paying tuition; interests: keep costs lowb. Professor- circumstance: benefits, interests: keep tuition high9. What is interest?a. Having a stake in public action and outcome in keeping cost low10. What is circumstance?a. What people do and how they get what they doCCJ3011Chiricos11. What is the only part of ideology we see?a. Reports because interests are obscured and commands are hidden12. How does ideology work?a. Make reports about the world to justify commands13. What is said about ideology?a. Normative rational discourse14. Why is ideology normative?a. It justifies action15. Why is ideology rational?a. Basis for justifying action is evidence of reports16. What is the ideology chart?a. Circumstances  interests  reports  commands  circumstances and/or interests17. What was the Ad example of ideology given in class?a. Action: buying magnesia productb. Circumstance-constipated18. What is the idea of classical criminology?a. They want punishment, but only a little19. What essay did Beccaria write?a. “Crime and Punishment”20. What are reports?a. They justify commands. Statements that tells what is, what was, what could be. Descriptive, explanation21. What are commands?a. Tell what should/ ought/ must be. They are normative. Implicit, not expressed. Obvious b/c of reports22. What are the circumstances that gave rise to classical criminology?a. Transition from Feudalism to capitalismCCJ3011Chiricosb. Enlightenment- critique of feudalism using human nature as ideal; relation to law, punishment and social controlc. Rigid Hierarchal Exclusive Social Arrangements; result- not free individuals; get what get b/c of who they ared. Emerging Class- Bourgeoisie* Market- what they could do , not b/c who they were, relatively free; make market exchanges to maximize utilitye. State power: controlled and exercised by land owners, monopoly of access to judicial positions; specialized courts/ punishments for nobilityf. Punishment 23. How did punishment differ between nobility and working class?a. Working class- punishment was a spectacle of excess, public, physical, prolonged to magnify difference b/t nobility24. What is the goal of classical criminology?a. To have consistent punishment25. Who is Michelle Foucault?a. Wrote “Discipline and Punish”; classical criminology first attempt at social control by managing what people thought rather than physically26. What was the Gazette to Amsterdam an example of?a. Excess punishment27. What is the interest of classical criminology?a. Subordinate rising of bourgeoisie 28. What do the reports of classical criminology start with?a. Human nature by way of anticipation; reflects bourgeoisie 29. How do the Bourgeoisie live?a. By way of rational calculation of utility:i. Want as much freedom as possibleii. Circumstances of life uncertain b/c of environmentiii. Want as much certainty as possibleiv. Inconsistency and punishment + unpredictabilityCCJ3011Chiricos30. What are the 3 attributes of human nature?a. Sensualb. Rationalc. Free as individuals31. What is the sensual behavior?a. Responsible to maximize pleasure and minimize pain32. What are 2 types of utility in sensual behavior?a. Moral standard utility- what they should dob. Individual motive33. What is rational behavior?a. Have as much evidence about efficiency of choice as possible34. What is free behavior as individuals?a. No constraints, free by nature; freedom to pursue utility- need/ want as little government intrusion as possible35. Example of free as individual?a. Protestant reformation- affirmation of what is true about human nature36. Sensual, rational and free behavior creates what commands of classical criminology?a. Certain, swift, consistent, proportional punishment b/c of reports37. What are the commands of punishment?a. Punishment should be consistent w/ human natureb. Punishment should intrude as little as possible on freedom- punishment should be as minimal as possiblec. Punishment should promote utility-greater good, greater #; can only be justified if it does38. How can punishment create a socially greater good?a. Should deter- incarceration39. How does deterrence work?CCJ3011Chiricosa. Fear of pain; punishment becomes evidence that a rational utility maximizing person can take into account when considering crime40. What type of ideology is positive criminology?a. Superordinate- no critique of power, reflects circumstances of superordinate41. Who is the father of positivism?a. August Compte- French Revolution write42. What did August Compte believe?a. Positive criminology is based on positive science of observation(not speculation)b. Not critical43. What was Compte looking for and who would he reveal them to?a. The laws of social statics and dynamics revealed to the statesmen and the multitudes44. What are statics and dynamics?a. Static-enduranceb. Dynamics-changes45. 6 commands of positivism?a. Consolidate orderb. Resign to inevitabilityc. Resolving revolutionary enterprised. Diminish crimee. Eliminate antisocial conductf. Engineer social consent*All supposed to lead to control46. Who’s essay is the keynote of positivism?a. Enrico Ferri47. Who is Hans Eysenck and what did he write?a. “Crime and Personality”- he wanted to eliminate antisocial conductCCJ3011Chiricos48. Most important report of positivism?a. Those intended to describe/ explain causes of criminal behavior49. Pursuit of cause is organized by what?a. Pathology, differentiation and determinism50. What is positive criminology?a. Scientific study looking for pathological difference


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