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WSU MKTG 477 - Active Response

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MKTG 477 1st Edition Lecture 12Outline of Last Lecture I. Information Process ModelII. Promotional Strategies and examplesOutline of Current Lecture II. “Active” Consumer (Cognitive Response) Modela. Commercial examplesIII. Common measurements of advertising effectivenessIV. “Inactive” and “Active” consumers V. Cognitive responsesCurrent LectureRecent development paper #1 – due Wednesday in class“Active” Consumer (Cognitive Response) Model- Consumers’ thoughts at the time of ad exposure (termed “cognitive responses”) influence their feelings toward the advertisement and the advertised brando It’s not the ad that influences us, it’s our feelingsCommercials shown in class- Juicy Fruit – locker room ad- Levis – “Don’t tell my girlfriend I’m gay”- United Color of Benetton – “Sentenced to Death”- Drug ad – rat coming out of mouth- Play Station – pees pants in bathroom playing handheld game- Play Station – “Stay in tonight”/booger ad What are two often-used measures of advertising effectiveness?- Product sales- Advertising recall – gives no information on how the consumer reacted to the advertisement- Neither are good measures “Inactive” Consumer – BAD These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.- Advertising exposure  ???  Outcomes (sales, ad recall)“Active” Consumer- Advertising exposure  Consumer reactions (“cognitive responses”)  Outcomes (brand attitudes, purchase intentions, etc.)Differences between Affect Transfer Model and Active Consumer Model- Affect Transfer Model only refers to generally feelings about an ad and takes place over time- Active Consumer Model goes a lot more in depth and is immediateCognitive responses include: we want all positives, but reactions depend on who is viewing your advertisement 1. Message relateda. Support arguments (positive)– Nissan has a great warranty, you believe Nissan makes great carsb. Counter arguments (negative)– You think Nissan makes lousy cars/you disagree with what you think the ad is saying 2. Source (spokesperson) relateda. Source bolsters (positive) – that person is good looking, I like that athlete, that guy in thead looks like my brother; I love my brotherb. Source derogations (negative) – I don’t like this ad because Tiger Woods in is it and he cheated on his wife3. Ad execution relateda. Favorable (positive) – I think the Juicy Fruit ad is funnyb. Unfavorable (negative) – I think the Juicy Fruit ad is stupid4. Miscellaneous – won’t be on exama. Getting cut off and having road rage while listening to Burger King ad, negative attitude towards Burger KingMissing step from Friday- Yielding and acceptance is overcome by this model and cognitive response


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