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JMU GKIN 100 - Flexibility

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GKIN 100 1st Edition Lecture 3Outline of Last Lecture II. Fast Twitch vs Slow twitch Musclesa. Slow twitchb. Fast twitchc. BothIII. Muscular strength vs Muscular endurancea. Motor unitsb. Muscle learningc. Hypertrophyd. AtrophyIV. Why is muscular strength and endurance important? V. Muscle contractions:a. Isometricb. Concentricc. EccentricVI. Strength TipsOutline of Current Lecture VII. Types of Stretching/Flexibilitya. Staticb. Dynamicc. Ballisticd. PNFVIII. Jointsa. Ball and socketb. HingeIX. Nervous SystemX. Assessing FlexibilityXI. Benefits of FlexibilityXII. FITT plan for flexibilityXIII. Back healthCurrent Lecture – FlexibilityFlexibility: ability of a joint to move through its normal range of motion.Types of stretching/FlexibilityThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.Static Flexibility: [COOL DOWN] the ability to hold an extended position at one end of a joints range of motion. Why after a workout? Its tough to stretch something cold. Hold this stretch for 20-30 seconds after a workout.Dynamic Flexibility: [WARM UP] ability to move a joint through its range of motion with little resistance. Use basic movements like jumping jacks to warm up. Or, for example, work from quarter squats, to half to full—work into the range of motion.Ballistic stretching: You don’t see this type of stretching much anymore, think “bouncing”. It’s more dangerous in terms of injury. PNF: Proprioceptive Neruomuscular Facilitation: Stretching with a partner. Apply pressure against the pressure with isometric contraction for about 8 seconds. Relax and then stretch further into the range of motion. KEY WORDS: Collagen, elastin, titin – you lose these things over time that lead to less flexible ability in your muscles.Joints: Hinge joint – 2 directions, forward and back (elbow, knee). Ball & Socket: many directions(hip).Nervous System: Proprioception – sending messages to muscles.GOAL when stretching: Attain normal flexibility in the major joints. Assessing FlexibilityThe sit and reach is one of the best ways but it is biased. Why? If you have short arms and long legs you are going to score better. Passive vs Active stretchingPassive stretching uses outside force, the stretch is not controlled by the muscles themselves.Benefits of Flexibility- Joint health- Preventing low back pain/injuries- Improved body position (why can’t you get to a certain position, is it because of flexibility, lack or strength, or lack of focus?)- Good posture and balance- NOTE: yes you can stretch too much, over stretch and strain a muscle. FITT plan for Flexibility- F – 2-3 Days/week (or after every workout)- I – to the point of mild discomfort not pain- T – 15-30 seconds, 2-4 times repeated- T – Stretching exercises (dynamic? Static?) that focuses on major joints. Back HealthOver 85% of americans have back pain at some point in their lives, it’s the second most common ailment. Why?- Weak inflexible muscles- Poor posture- Poor body mechanics during activitiesREMEMBER: Practice doesn't make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect. It takes about 5,000 correct repititions in order to be “normal” for the


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