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MSU HSTR 102IH - Medieval Society

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HSTR 102ih 1nd Edition Lecture 3 Current Lecture -Feudalism- Society was dominated by warlords (they would gain land through war with neighboring countries).- Vassals: Subordinates protecting warlords in exchange for land (this is called a Fief)- Peasants: Worked the land- There was a lack of central government- Dominated by a non-commercial rural, economy-Stratified Society- Regular clergy: Monks living in monasteries, they had to be 21 before taking vows.- Despite the isolation, not all of them were cut off, some worked in charity, schools and festivals. They also took time to help those in need.- The church is dominate (Catholicism) - Secular Clergy worked among the public- In order of power:Top: CardinalArchbishopBishopMiddle: Urban PriestBottom:Parish Priests- Monasteries owning lots of land could be very wealthy- Secular authorities did not tax clergy; crimes were adjudicated in special ecclesiastical courts.These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.- Church had excommunication powers, including Christian burial- Nuns: Women who couldn’t join the clergy and lived in convents. They were allowed shelter from burdens such as pregnancy- There were not very many in Europe-Nobility- Nobles: Lived off labor of others- Negotiated how many days to work for warlord- Were also financial support for warlordLord had to:Protect VassalProvide a FiefVassals could have VassalsFiefs were passed down from generation to generation-Peasant Life- Rural people- They were 80% of medieval society- Worked a lord’s land. They owed fees, rent and taxes to lords and church- The family was the basic social unit- A family on average had 5 people- They were usually loaned stuff by a Lord - Slept on straw pallets- Life:- Got married in their late-teens, early 20’s- Society had a relaxed view towards premarital sex- Female virginity was not a concern for most men- Divorce could be arranged- Regulated through extended breastfeeding and herbs- Illegitimacy was not heavily stigmatized- Children often had the same name (if one died, the next one born would receive the same name)- Surnames appeared by the end of the 13th century- Children had the surname of Lord’s profession-City Life- There were fewer people in cities than in villages- Of 50 million people, 5% lived in cities- Largest towns were in Italy- London had 10,000 people, while Florence had 100,000- Cities were created by Lords to offer peace and protection- Towns attracted peasants to make money- Trades in guilds- An apprenticeship lasted for 5 years- Most business cluster around church- Wealthy elite emerge - Cities became centers of education, even universities-Famine and Black Death- Population doubled between 1000 and 1300 to reach 100 million people- A 3 field system led to a greater food supply- Northern Europe enters a ‘little ice age’ in the 14th century- Black Death (1347-1350) kills off 66% of the population, which brings it down to roughly 30 million- Transmitted by fleas from rats (The fleas moved from the dying rat to a living human).- Humans could not infect each other (Bubonic Plague)- Pneumatic plague could be passed from sneezing and wheezing- Plague was worst in the summer, with symptoms that were similar to common sickness. Infected people sprouted egg sized bubos that would burst on legs and under armpits- Lepers, Jews and Arabs were blamed for the black death and Jews were targeted as “Christ killers”- As money lenders, they were viewed as Christian blood suckersQuestons:How would a major catastrophe affect survivors?Would ideas be


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