New version page

MSU SOC 100 - Socialization and Social Networks

Type: Lecture Note
Pages: 6

This preview shows page 1-2 out of 6 pages.

View Full Document
View Full Document

End of preview. Want to read all 6 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a GradeBuddy member to access this document.

View Full Document
Unformatted text preview:

SOC 100 1st Edition Lecture 6Socialization and Social NetworksSocialization and the self Socialization: A process by which people develop a sense of self-within context of social relations-associated with nurture-in opposition to nature Learning to be an individual- Sense of self , separate from others - Communication (speech development)- EmpathyLearning to be a group member- Adopting collective norms- Collective memory- Trying different identitiesGroup IdentityConformitySelf and OthersSocial status: “Symbolic Interactionism”- Ascribed: attached to you by others i.e.gender/race (physical characteristics - Achieved: college education- Master: thing people first see when they look at you (gender or race)Roles: “Symbolic Interactionism” or “Functionalism”- Role conflict ( 1 role) “mother vs. worker”- Role strain (2 diff roles) “helicopter parent vs letting child be independent”- Groups: in group and out group NATURE VS NURTURE These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.- Biology provides possibilities, does not determine outcomes- Language development - Sex/gender relationshipNeural Plasticity: neurons respond to stimuli in environment; social interactions changes our brains Socialization and Mass Media Agents of Socialization Mass media images= lessons onhow to be an ideal member of society - Unhealthy body weight - Fashion trends = $$$- Limited depictions of people of color - Acceptable masculinity Social NetworksSocial capital: social networks that produce useful material or social resources - Sense of mutual obligation and trust worthiness - Usually thought to have economic value Bonding social capital vs. bridging social capital Socialization: the process by which people develop a sense of self and learn the ways of the society in which they live 1. acquire a sense of self and social identity2. learnabout the social groups to which they belong and do not belong3. develop their human capacities4. learn to negotiate the social and physical environment they’ve inheritedInternalization: process by which people take as their own and accept as binding the norms, values, beliefs, and language that their socializers are attempting to pass on Nature: human genetic makeup or biological inheritanceNurture: the social experiences that make up every individuals lifeCollective memory: the experiences shared and recalled by significant numbers of people. Such memories are revived, preserved, shared, passed on , and recast in many forms, such as stories, holidays,rituals, and monuments Development of the social self: The self becomes an object when children can 1. take the role of the other (role take) 2. name , classify, and categorize the self“George Herbert Mead”The key to role taking is self awarenessRole taking: the process of stepping into another person’s shoes by which to imaginatively view and assess our behaviorStages: 1. preparatory2. play3. games1. preparatory stage: age 2 and under; symbolically imitating others2. play stage: ages 2-6a. play: voluntary, spontaneous activity with few or no formal rules. b. Significant others: people or characters such as cartoon characters a parent, or the family pet 3. Games: age 7+ -structured organized activities that involve more than one person. 1. follow established rules2. take simultaneously the roles of all participants 3. see how their role fits in relation to an established system of expectations. Generalized Other: A system of expected behaviors and meanings that transcend the people participating Significant Symbols:Gestures that convey the same meaning to the people transmitting them and receiving them. Gesture: any action that requires people to interpret its meaning before responding Looking glass self: A process in which a sense of self develops, enabling one to see oneself reflected in others’ real or imagined reactions to one’s appearance and behaviors. Cognitive Development: The sensorimotor stageThe preoperational stageThe concrete operational stageThe formal operational stageAgents of Socialization: significant others, primary groups, and institutions, shape our sense of self, thought patterns, and responses to the social and physical environment Examples: family, peers, military units, teachers, mass media, religious groups Group: two or more people who do the following: 1. share a distinct identity; the ability to speak a specific language, biological descent from a specific couple, membership in a team or military unit. 2. Feel a sense of belonging3. Interact directly or indirectly with one another Primary Group: A social group that has face-to-face contact and strong emotional ties among its membersEx: family, military unit, peer groupMass media: communication structures, and platforms designed with the goal of reaching large audiences. Stage 1: infancy Stage 2: ToddlerStage 3: PreschoolStage 4: ages 6-12 or childhoodStage 5: adolescenceStage 6: young adulthoodStage 7: middle age Stage 8: Old age Re- Socialization: breaking with behaviors and ways of thinking that are unsuited to existing or changing circumstances and replacing them with new, more appropriate ways of behaving and thinking. Total Institutions: people surrender control of their lives, (voluntarily/involuntarily) to an administrative staff and carry out daily activities with others required to do the same thing. Social interaction: a situation in which at least two people communicate and respond using words, gestures, and other symbols to affect each other’s behavior and thinking.Social structure: a largely invisible system that coordinates and constrains behavior in broadly predictable ways Social status: a human created and defined position in societyAscribed statuses: social statuses that are the result of chance in that people exert no effort to obtain them. A person’s birth order, race, biological sex, and age qualify as scribed characteristicsAchieved statuses: social statuses acquired through some combination of personal choice, effort, and ability. A person’s marital status, occupation, and education are examples of achieved statuses. Status set: All the statuses any one person assumes. Master Status: One status in a status set that overshadows the others such that it shapes every aspect of life and dominates social interactions Role: the behavior expected of a status in


View Full Document
Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view Socialization and Social Networks and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view Socialization and Social Networks and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?