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DCCCD HIST 1301 - Syllabus

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1 HIST 1301-4231 Course Syllabus Wintermester (December 16-January 6) Professor: D’Lynn Gage, M.S. Office Hours: By appointment Office Phone: 214-233-5313 Email: d’[email protected] Course Information Course Description: We will survey the history of the United States from the early days of the European settlement on the American continent through the establishment of colonies, the creation of a nation and conclude with the war that nearly destroyed the nation. We will focus on the major events, movements and issues of this time. History and the study of history is not simply recognition of chronologies and timelines nor is it only concerned with presidents and wars. We will consider the lives of ordinary people and look to understand the effect of major events on their lives. With each person, movement, event we study, our shared objective is that you will be able to identify the cultural, economic and political meaning of these areas of study. Some basic information- such as dates and places- can be crucial in fully understanding a topic, but greater emphasis will be placed on the ability to know the significance of an event. Required Texts: 1. The American Journey, by David Goldfield (Concise Ed). Published by Pearson Education, 2008. ISBN: 97880135150917. (any edition will work, but they will have this one in the Book Store on campus.) Student Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate a broad knowledge of the chronology of major events and trends in U.S. history to 1877. 2. Demonstrate the ability to identify and evaluate historical sources, distinguishing between primary and secondary sources. 3. Demonstrate knowledge of the causes of various conflicts (such a wars, social movements, political movements, and economic conflicts) and the effects of their outcomes during the course of U.S. history to 1877. 4. Demonstrate knowledge of the origins and foundations of American Democracy, including the founding documents and the democratic values of freedom, equality, and justice.2 5. Demonstrate the importance of expansionism, manifest destiny, and western settlement during the course of U.S history to 1877. 6. Demonstrate writing skills by successfully producing a written exercise. Course Objectives Intellectual Competencies: - Analyze and interpret a variety of printed materials- books, documents and articles- at a college level. - Produce clear, correct and coherent prose adapted to purpose, occasion and audience-at a college level. - Analyze and interpret various forms of spoken communication and possess sufficient literacy skills of writing and reading- at a college level. - Think and analyze at a critical level. Exemplary Educational Objectives: - Examine social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods, social structures, and cultures. - Develop and communicate alternative explanations or solutions for contemporary social issues. - Understand the evolution and current role of the U.S. in the world. - Differentiate and analyze historical evidence (documentary and statistical) and differing points of view. - Recognize and apply reasonable criteria for the acceptability of historical evidence and social research. - Identify and understand differences and commonalties within diverse cultures. Requirements You are expected to attend and participate in class, read the assignments before class, prepare and execute 1 presentations, take 4 exams, and complete daily assignments in class 1. Attendance/Participation: Attendance is a must. Exams will cover material from the lecture as well as from the text. 1 absence is considered excessive and will lower your final grade by 10 points. Over 2 absences will lower your final grade 20 points. We will be doing in class activates that cannot be made up. These activities count towards your participation grade. Participation in class discussions is encouraged and can affect your final grade in a positive way. Participation and questions are encouraged. 2. Presentation: on one occasion, students will give a 10-15-minute presentation to the class over a small section of the text. Students will submit a hard copy of their presentation3 due the day they are to present. These presentations cannot be made up. If you are absent the day of your presentation you cannot make up the points. Evaluation criteria: The instructor will grade each presentation based on the in class presentation and the typed copy. Page 4 of this syllabus has the grading rubrics for the in class presentation and the hard copy. 3. Exams: You will have 2 exams; the last exam will be the final exam. Each exam will consist of a section of multiple choice, true/ false questions, and short essays. These exams will cover material from the reading and the lectures. Each exam will be worth 100 points. 4. Quizzes: We will have a quiz for chapters 1-15 before we begin discussion on each chapter. 5. In-class Written Exercises: We will have 3 in class written exercises that must be complete in class. More information will be given before the assignment. Grades: Attendance/Participation 110 points Presentation 50 points 2 Exams 200 points 15 Quizzes 300 points 3 in-class written exercises 90 points _____________________________________________________________________ Total 750 points 675-750 points =A 600-674 points =B 525-599 points = C 450-524 = D 0- 450 points = F4 Grading Rubric- In Class Presentations: 1. Introduction of Self 0 2 2. Introduction of Topic 0 2 3. Finding 1 0 3 4. Finding 2 0 3 5. Finding 3 0 3 6. Presentation time, quality of presentation 0 3 6 9 12 Comments: Grading Rubric- Typed copy of Presentation 1. Title page 0 2 2. Typed and double spaced 0 2 3. Format (citing, one-inch margins on all sides, 12-point, Times New Roman font) 0 2 4 6 8 4. Spelling 0 1 2 3 5. Complete sentences 0 2 4 6. 3 findings 0 2 4 6 Comments:5 In the classroom: - Please be on time. Coming in late is a major distraction to us all. Class start at 12:30. If you arrive late you will sign in-2 late arrivals equal one absence. - Please have cell turned off. There is


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