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UT Arlington POLS 2312 - Federalism Continued

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POLS 2312 1st Edition Lecture 3 Current LectureFederalism Continued…Dual Federalism: - Two levels of government are co-equal sovereigns, each supreme with its own sphere. - The Constitution: a compact between the states?- 10th amendment as a limitation on the national government; believes in narrow reading of “Necessary and Proper” clause “Cooperative Federalism:- Assumes the national government is supreme. - Views the people, rather than the sates, as the source of the government’s legitimacy.- Loose interpretation of the necessary and proper clause; emphasis on the Supremacy clause. o National assumption of state debts, funding of existing public debto National bank o Excise tax on alcohol o Tariff on imports. The Democratic-Republicans: - Support centered in the west and the south. - Envisioned an agrarian republic, with individual liberty grounded in land ownership and responsive local government. The Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions (1798-99) - Alien and Sedition Acts (1798) - Sedition Act used to convict 10 men, most of whom where Democratic-Republican newspaper editors. These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.- KY and VA suggested that when the federal government, exceeded its authority, the states could nullify its acts. The Nullification Crisis: - John Calhoun (SC) argued that the federal government was a creation of the states, which were the final arbiters of the constitutionality of laws. - “Tariff of Abominations” (1828) - Compromise Tariff (1832)o “The union must and shall be preserved” –Andrew Jackson o Opposed the nullification crisis and wanted to send people to South Carolina to get their tariffs. o The union won the Civil War!!The “Civil War Amendments”: - 13th amendment (1865): outlawed slavery - 14th amendment (1868): created a national citizenship - 15th amendment (1870): national right to vote regardless of “race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” The New Deal (1933-1937): - created programs to help the unemployed - 1935 Congress passed the Social Security act The Great Society (circa 1965): - Linda Bay Johnson- former mayor and congressmen of Texas - Medical care act was placed. Grants-in-aid: - Programs through which congress provides money to state and local governments on the condition that the funds be employed for purposes defined by the federal government. - Medicaid is the largest grant-in-aido In 1929 America entered the depression and it lasted till World War II. o Speed limits are a classical example of police authority and goes under the 10th amendment. o Lowered speed limits so gas demand would go down. In 1995 they took back thelaw. o Every state has a minimum age of 21 to drink. If states didn’t raise the drinking age to 21 they would take away 10% of highway funding. Virginia and the PPAC Act: (“Obamacare”) - In February 2010, VA enacted a law stating that “No resident of this Commonwealth. . . shall be required to obtain or maintain a policy of individual [health] insurance coverage.”- In March 2010, Congress passed the PPAC, mandating that individuals have health insurance beginning in 2014.The Supremacy Clause (Article VI, section 2): “This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof... shall be the supreme Law of the Land... any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary


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