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UT Arlington POLS 2312 - Federalist

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POLS 2312 1st Edition Lecture 2 Current Lecture1787 Constitution - The “Federalist”- supporters of the proposed new Constitution, which included George Washington and Benjamin Franklin - The “Anti-Federalist”- critics of the Constitution, which included Patrick Henry and Samuel Adams A Betrayal of the Revolution? The new Constitution…- would likely result in higher taxes - would weaken the power of the States relative to the national government - contained no explicit list of rights of Americans - Constitution came into effect after being ratified by nine out of thirteen states during 1788- Washington was elected President - First Congress passed Bill of Rights and Judiciary of 1789 The 10th Amendment: “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.” - Basically this amendment is saying that the powers that are not listed to the federal government then they are the states powers.Federalism: - A division of power/sovereignty between the central government and subnational governments (states) Powers Granted to Congress (Article 1, Section 8) Include….These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.- Tax and Spend to provide for the “common defense” and “general welfare” of the United States, coin money, borrow money, declare war, and regulate interstate and foreign commerce. - “To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing powers…” - Powers not delegated to the national government are “reserved” to the states or people.- Police power: The power reserved to the government to regulate the health, safety, andmorals of citizens. Dual Federalism: A vision of the constitution in which the federal government and the state governments inhabit separate spheres. (Like a layer cake and how the layers are stacked and separate from each other) “Cooperative Federalism” A vision of federalism in which the federal government, states, and localities share responsibilities. (Like a marble cake and how everything is mixed together but you can still where the cake is and where the marble is) Benefits of Federalism: - Protection against centralized power. - States are the “laboratories of democracy” they may experiment with the new policies. - States and localities are potentially more responsive to local needs, potential for greater citizen involvement. Allows for


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