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1 Chemistry 104-5—Spring 2012 Course Credit: 5 credit hours Lecture: 3:30 – 4:20 p.m., MWF Location: 1351 Chemistry Lecturer: Dr. Jeannine R. Szczech Office: Chemistry 4227 Phone: (608) 890-0794 E-mail: [email protected] (Use subject line: Chem 104-5) Office Hours: TBA (See [email protected] Homepage) [email protected]: http://learnuw.wisc.edu/ Chemistry 104 is the second semester course in the two-semester sequence. Chemistry 103 and 104, providing a general survey of chemical principles and facts, are prerequisites for advanced courses such as Organic Chemistry (341 or 343) and Analytical Chemistry (327 or 329). The prerequisite for Chemistry 104 is Chemistry 103, and it is assumed that you took this course last semester. If your situation is different, you may need to put in extra effort at the beginning of the semester to gain the necessary background. Proficiency in manipulating equations, including the use of exponents, logarithms and antilogarithms is essential—if your math proficiency is not at a satisfactory level, you will find it difficult to solve many of the chemical problems you will encounter in this course. REQUIRED MATERIALS Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science with MasteringChemistry Technology Kit, 12th Edition. This text book and technology kit is sold only at the University Bookstore, Underground Textbook Exchange and Beat the Bookstore. Lab Manual: Chemistry 104 Laboratory Manual, Spring 2012, Department of Chemistry, UW-Madison, sold (for cash only, $15) in Chemistry Building starting the first day of class. Lab Notebook: 100 page carbonless lab notebook available at local bookstores and in the Chemistry Building. You may use the remaining pages in your Chemistry 103 lab notebook if you desire. Safety Goggles: Industrial quality eye protection is required at all times when you are in the lab. Safety goggles that fit over regular glasses can be purchased at local bookstores. Contact lenses should not be worn in the laboratory because fumes or splashes may be caught between them and your eye. Safety rules are posted on your laboratory door. Calculator: An inexpensive calculator having capabilities for square roots, logarithms and exponentiation (antilogarithms), and exponential (scientific) notation operations is required. It is advantageous to purchase a calculator that is capable of solving the quadratic formula, if possible. Programmable (graphing) calculators will not be allowed on exams. USB Drive: You should bring a USB drive with you to the laboratory so you can save your experimental data. UW Copy Card: Printing lab reports, graphs, data, etc. in the Chemistry Library or the computer room requires a copy card. Copy cards can be purchased in any campus library, including the Chemistry Library (Room 2361). i-Clickers: We will be using an i-Clicker in the lecture portion of this course. You can purchase an i-Clicker at the bookstore. You will need to register your i-Clicker, and we have placed a registration box on the course home page on [email protected] Click on the registration box and follow the instructions to register your i-Clicker. We will track individual student participation, so it's important to register you i-Clicker!2 [email protected] The Chemistry 104 [email protected] web site contains a course schedule with assigned homework, lecture notes, supplementary reading, on-line quizzes and other material. YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE checking the site frequently throughout the semester, accessing the materials you need, and printing out anything you need in hard-copy form. Practice Quiz: Much of the material for this course is ONLY AVAILABLE via [email protected] For this reason, it is imperative that you have access to a computer (yours, a friend’s, or one in a computer lab) that is correctly set up to interface with [email protected] Login to [email protected] from the computer you intend to use to access the site and take the Practice Quiz. The questions are not intended to test your knowledge of any subject, only to verify that the computer you are using is set up correctly. If you have trouble getting your own computer to do the Practice Quiz, use a computer in the chemistry building's computer lab (Room 1375). The Practice Quiz will be available to you throughout the semester, should you change computers and need to ensure all the functions work. LECTURE AND DISCUSSION Lecture. Lectures organize the material, outline goals, cover the basic principles of each topic and present illustrations and demonstrations. The lecture is not intended to describe or explain everything you will learn in the course; rather, it will indicate important topics to study and will give you an opportunity to think about these topics and see if you understand them. You should take notes during lecture that reflect your understanding of what you heard and saw. My lecture notes will be posted online at the course homepage after each lecture. Lecture Etiquette. Given the size of our lecture, it’s important that we all follow some basic etiquette rules. Do not engage in other activities (such as texting, talking, surfing the web, watching videos on your computer, reading the newspaper, etc.) during lecture or discussion, as these activities are disruptive and distracting to those around you. The use of laptops, cell phones, and other electronic devices is strictly prohibited in the lecture hall. If you need to make a phone call, check your email, etc., please exit the lecture hall quietly to do so. If you bring a cell phone to class or lab, turn it off for the duration of the class or lab period. If your phone rings during lecture, discussion, or lab, you may be asked to leave. Students who demonstrate a disregard for other students’ right to learn during lecture will be asked to leave, and Dr. Szczech may request a meeting to discuss poor lecture behavior. Lecture ends at 4:20 p.m.; do not pack up early, as it creates a lot of noise and can prevent your classmates from hearing the lecture. Demonstrations. The UW-Madison Chemistry Department has a longstanding tradition of using lecture demonstrations to help students understand chemistry. When a demonstration is done in class, observe what happens and make certain that you understand the principles the demonstration is designed to illustrate. If you do not, ask


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