New version page

UNLV PSC 101 - Syllabus

Documents in this Course
Load more

This preview shows page 1-2 out of 7 pages.

View Full Document
View Full Document

End of preview. Want to read all 7 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a GradeBuddy member to access this document.

View Full Document
Unformatted text preview:

1UNLV Introduction to American Politics PSC 101 Sect 1011 Fall 2011 M, W. 5:00 to 6:45 PM BEH 104 SYLLABUS I. COURSE OBJECTIVES: 1. To provide students with a general overview of what political science is and how it relates to the other social sciences. 2. To develop the students’ knowledge and understanding of the United States Constitution. 3. To develop the students’ understanding of the major institutions of government: legislature, executive, judiciary, and the bureaucracy. 4. To increase the students’ understanding of how government has and will affect their lives and those of their progeny. II. COURSE OUTLINE: The course provides a basic overview of the political system, institutions and policies of the United States. The course will be divided into three separate but related sections. The first section will examine the formal (Constitutional) institutions of American government. This section will provide an in-depth examination of the Constitution itself as well as the US Congress, the American Presidency, the Bureaucracy, and the Judiciary. Also, a discussion of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights will be included in this section to illustrate the workings of these institutions. The second section will focus on the informal institutions of American government. This section will examine the role of political socialization and ideology, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, and the media in American politics. The final section will focus on other various related topics including foreign policy, social welfare policy and economic policy. This section will illustrate how the institutions of American government work in the creation of these policies. Also included in this section will be the study and discussion of American Federalism. Interspersed throughout the semester at appropriate times will be readings and discussion of the Nevada Constitution and how our state system of government functions here in Nevada.2III. COURSE ADMINISTRATION: 1. Instructor: Rick Steinkamp Office – Wright Building A-226 Hours: Mon., Wed. 4PM to 5PM Telephone: 895-5250 (office) 898-0562 (home) E-mail: [email protected] 2. Textbooks and Lecture Graphics: 1. Ginsberg, Lowi, and Weir We the People 87th Edition) W.W. Norton and Co. (2011) This text is available at the UNLV Bookstore or may be purchased as an e-book. Further information is provided in a separate handout. 2. Bowers, Michael The Sagebrush State: Nevada’s History, Government, and Politics (3rd Edition) Nevada Press (2007). One copy of this book is available on 2-hour reserve at the Circulation Desk at Lied Library. 3. Student Responsibilities: Each student is responsible for all the assigned reading materials. These materials include the textbook, hand-outs, and materials that may be placed on reserve in the library. The instructor may require a few home work assignments as a supplement to the lectures. Students will be expected to complete all the homework assignments and use them as a basis for classroom discussion. All homework assignments must be turned in on the deadline date. 4. Method of instruction: The course will be taught in an informal lecture/seminar format with emphasis on student participation. Your contributions to the class through your attentiveness, the frequency and quality of your contributions, and the degree of your preparation will influence your grade. While the syllabus provides a structured path, current events may suggest some worthwhile detours. The contents and/or dates of this syllabus are thus subject to change. 5. Class Attendance: Attendance in this course is crucial. The students should arrive at the class on time or even a few minutes prior to the session. This instructor prefers that you come to class late rather than not at all, but if you must be late, enter the classroom quietly and take your seat with the least possible disruption. If you must leave class before it is over, please notify me before class and again, make the least possible disruption. Each student’s attendance and punctuality have a direct quantifiable effect upon his or her “Student Participation” grade. Students are expected to take all exams. There will be no make-up exams. EXCEPT FOR EXTRODINARY CIRCUMSTANCES, A STUDENT MUST TAKE THE FINAL EXAMINATION IN ORDER TO PASS THE COURSE.3 You may not attend class if you are not registered for the class. You may not attend a course section if you are not registered for that section. If you are requested by the Registrar or an Advisement office to obtain a faculty signature for any kind of add/drop or other administrative action, you will be referred to the Chairman of the Political Science Department. 6. Academic Misconduct – Academic integrity is a legitimate concern for every member of the campus community; all share in upholding the fundamental values of honesty, trust, respect, fairness, responsibility and professionalism. By choosing to join the UNLV community, students accept the expectations of the Academic Misconduct Policy and are encouraged when faced with choices to always take the ethical path. Students enrolling in UNLV assume the obligation to conduct themselves in a manner compatible with UNLV’s function as an educational institution. An example of academic misconduct is plagiarism. Plagiarism is using the words or ideas of another, from the Internet or any source, without proper citation of the sources. See the Student Academic Misconduct Policy (approved December 9, 2005) located at: http://studentconduct.unlv.edu/misconduct/policy.html. 7. Copyright – The University requires all members of the University Community to familiarize themselves and to follow copyright and fair use requirements. You are individually and solely responsible for violations of copyright and fair use laws. The university will neither protect nor defend you nor assume any responsibility for employee or student violations of fair use laws. Violations of copyright laws could subject you to federal and state civil penalties and criminal liability, as well as disciplinary action under University policies. Additional information can be found at: http://provost.unlv.edu/copyright/. 8. Disability Resource Center (DRC) – The Disability Resource Center (DRC) determines accommodations that are “reasonable” in promoting the equal access of a student reporting a


View Full Document
Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view Syllabus and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view Syllabus and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?