New version page

FSU EDF 1005 - Notes

Documents in this Course
Notes

Notes

12 pages

Load more
Upgrade to remove ads

This preview shows page 1-2-3-4-5 out of 15 pages.

Save
View Full Document
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 15 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 15 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 15 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 15 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 15 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience

Upgrade to remove ads
Unformatted text preview:

1. Characteristics to represent a professional:(page 14-19)*autonomy*decision making and reflection*specialized body of knowledge*code of ethics2. Extrinsic, Intrinsic, and Intellectual rewards of teaching:(page 5-8)Intrinsic:Come from within and are personally satisfying for emotional or intellectual reasonsExtrinsic:Rewards that come from outsideInclude job security, vacations, convenient schedules, and occupational statusCan both attract people to teaching and induce them to leaveIntellectual: Intellectual rewards are related to thinking about and teaching academic content.3. Components of culturally responsive teaching:(page 108)-accepting and valuing cultural differences-accommodating different cultural interaction patterns-building on student’s cultural backgrounds4. Inclusion for child with exceptionalities:(page 145)A comprehensive approach to educating students with exceptionalities that incorporates a total, systematic, and coordinated web of services. Includes students with special needs in a regular school campus Places students with special needs in age- and grade- appropriate classrooms Provides special education support within the regular classroom5. Various Language programs:(page 110-112)Bilingual Education*Bilingual Maintenance language programs: -use and sustain the first language*Transition Programs:-maintain first language while students learn English*Immersion programs:-emphasize rapid transition to English*ESL (English as a Second Language programs;-focus on English in academic subjects6. How boys and girls differ in schools:(page 116-117)*Innate differences between boys and girls are very small7. Difference between mainstreaming and inclusion:(page 145) Broader, more comprehensive than mainstreamingInclusions three components: Includes students with special needs in a regular school campus Places students with special needs in age- and grade- appropriate classrooms Provides special education support within the regular classroom8. What is the exceptionality that is most common in American public schools today? (page 148)*Learning disabilities9. SES and the factors included in the definition of SES(page 20, 73-79)-income-education-occupation-housing10. Zero-tolerance and the potential consequences of implementing Zero tolerance in schools(page 87, 89) Students automatically suspended for offenses involving weapons, threats, or drugs Mandated by Congress and enforced by 75% of all schools Supported by teachers (70%) and parents (68%) Advocates claim they work, making schools safer. Critics question their effectiveness and find flaws in implementation, especially for minority students.11. Effective approaches for students placed at risk(page 90-95) Schools are safe and orderly with an emphasis on community and student responsibility. Teachers are personal and caring, emphasize student responsibility,and have high expectations for students. Effective instruction is interactive with increased structure, support, and feedback.12. Educational legislation(chapter 6)First amendment:  Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.Tenth amendment: Established a major educational role for statesOld deluder Satan act: Provided a legal foundation for the public support of education13. Four major educational philosophies:(page 199-204)*Perennialism: suggests that nature, including human nature, is constant and that schools should teach classic knowledge*Essentialism: emphasizes a critical core of knowledge and skills that all students should learn*Progresivism: focuses on real world problems solving and individual development*Social Reconstructionism: contents that schools, teachers, and students should play role in addressing the social inequities in our society14. Why developing a philosophy of education is essential Perennialism suggests that nature, including human nature, is constant and that schools should teach classic knowledge. Essentialism emphasizes a critical core of knowledge and skills that all students should learn. Progressivism focuses on real-world problem solving and individual development. Social Reconstructionism contends that schools, teachers, and students should play role in addressing the social inequities in our society. Philosophy can guide practice and help you explain and defend youreducational goals. The process of developing a philosophy begins with identifying and follows by examining your own beliefs about teaching, learning, and students. An analysis of educational philosophies can assist teachers in forming their own personal, and probably eclectic, personal philosophy.15. Functions of all branches of educational government (chapter 9 powerpoint page 254-261)16. Vouchers and why they started(page 275-276) Vouchers are checks parents use to purchase educational services. Use for private education, especially religious schools, is controversial. State tuition tax credits, a variation on vouchers, provide tax cuts for parents of children attending private schools.17. Limitations of laws that regulate the and responsibilities of teachers (chapter 10 powerpoint 295-296) Laws are purposely general and vague so they can apply to a varietyof specific situations. Laws were created in response to problems that arose or existed in the past. Laws specify teachers’ rights and responsibilities; they don’t addresswhat teachers should do. Professional ethics provide a set of moral standards for the teacher.18. Relationship between teachers’ legal responsibilities and their ethical responsibiltes (chapter 10 powerpoint) What we CAN do – Rights What we MUST do – Responsibilities What we SHOULD do – Ethics Ethics – the discipline that examines values and offers principles thatcan be used to decide whether acts are right or wrong.19. Teacher (page 292 and 299) Designed to protect teachers from political or personal abuses and ensure the stability of the teaching force Controversial because critics say it protects incompetent teachers Administrators and teachers differ on the need for tenure20. Legal Responsibilities21. Reduction of force (riffing) (page 293)Reduction in force Is due to declining enrollment


View Full Document
Download Notes
Our administrator received your request to download this document. We will send you the file to your email shortly.
Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view Notes and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view Notes 2 2 and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?