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Data collections:Uniform Crime Reports (UCR)National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS)Record information on crimes reported to themGets data fromProduced by FBICatalog data on the rates of crimeProperty crimeRapesGives clearance rates (cases are closed and solved)ProblemA lot of crime goes unreportedNational Crime Victimization Surveys (NCVS)How many times were you victimized?Did you report them?What types of crime?Type of crime that goes unreported: rapeDeterred from reporting due to shame, threatening, etc.Racial Disparities:United States 750 per 100,0001 in 100 in jail or prison1 in 31 under some form of correctional supervision1 in 36 Latino adults1 in 15 Black adults1 in 9 males age 20-34 (Pew Center for the States)Why? (Pg. 27-30)Terry v. Ohio (1968)Terry stopsStopping people on the street without probable cause due to their raceProbable Cause51% confident or higher that someone has engaged in illegal activityReasonable suspicion (lower standard)A little more than a hunch or feelingCan articulate that hunch and why they feel that way in order to engageIs this justice?If you criminalize people you are increasing their likeliness to commit a crimeTrends in Crime:1980-NowCriminalViolentPropertyCivilGeographic TrendsCrime concentration in southern statesChanges in population:Age (aged 16-24 are most crime prone)High school or collegeNaturally you are likely to age out of crimeExperimental ageVery impressionableCriminalized at one age and then deterred after caughtRaceGenderMajority of men are criminalizedPovertyPeople in bad areas are more likely to engage in criminal behaviorEducationUnemploymentIce cream?Correlation doesn’t equal causationDrug CrimeCrack/Cocaine linked to violent crime increase in 1980sVictimization TrendsMost likely: Black teenagersLeast likely: Elderly white womenIntra-racial: 2/3 victims are same race as attackerFamiliarity: Stranger vs. AcquaintanceMost crimes are committed by acquaintancesPOSSIBLE MIDTERM QUESTIONS:What are the two primary criminal justice data collections?What is the case of Terry v. Ohio?What are the rates of incarceration by race?Which country has the highest rate of incarceration in the world?Have drug possession arrests increased or decreased over the past 20 years?Has the rate of property crime increased or decreased over the past 20 years?Has the rate of violent crime increased or decreased over the past 20 years?What is a crime “hot spot”?Are ice cream sales correlated with homicide rates?Who are most/least likely to be victimized?Crime Trends 03/02/2014 12:18:00← Data collections:- Uniform Crime Reports (UCR)o National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) Record information on crimes reported to them Gets data fromo Produced by FBIo Catalog data on the rates of crime  Property crime Rapeso Gives clearance rates (cases are closed and solved)o Problem A lot of crime goes unreported- National Crime Victimization Surveys (NCVS)o How many times were you victimized?o Did you report them?o What types of crime?o Type of crime that goes unreported: rape Deterred from reporting due to shame, threatening, etc. ← Racial Disparities:- United States 750 per 100,000o 1 in 100 in jail or prisono 1 in 31 under some form of correctional supervisiono 1 in 36 Latino adultso 1 in 15 Black adultso 1 in 9 males age 20-34 (Pew Center for the States)- Why? (Pg. 27-30)o Terry v. Ohio (1968) Terry stops Stopping people on the street without probable cause due to their race Probable Cause 51% confident or higher that someone has engaged in illegal activity  Reasonable suspicion (lower standard) A little more than a hunch or feeling Can articulate that hunch and why they feel that way in order to engage - Is this justice?- If you criminalize people you are increasing their likeliness to commit a crime← Trends in Crime:- 1980-Nowo Criminal Violent Propertyo Civil- Geographic Trendso Crime concentration in southern states- Changes in population:o Age (aged 16-24 are most crime prone) High school or college Naturally you are likely to age out of crime Experimental age Very impressionable Criminalized at one age and then deterred after caughto Raceo Gender Majority of men are criminalizedo Poverty People in bad areas are more likely to engage in criminal behavioro Educationo Unemploymento Ice cream? Correlation doesn’t equal causation - Drug Crimeo Crack/Cocaine linked to violent crime increase in 1980s- Victimization Trendso Most likely: Black teenagerso Least likely: Elderly white womeno Intra-racial: 2/3 victims are same race as attackero Familiarity: Stranger vs. Acquaintance  Most crimes are committed by acquaintances←← POSSIBLE MIDTERM QUESTIONS:- What are the two primary criminal justice data collections?- What is the case of Terry v. Ohio?- What are the rates of incarceration by race?- Which country has the highest rate of incarceration in the world?- Have drug possession arrests increased or decreased over the past 20 years?- Has the rate of property crime increased or decreased over the past 20 years?- Has the rate of violent crime increased or decreased over the past 20 years?- What is a crime “hot spot”?- Are ice cream sales correlated with homicide rates?- Who are most/least likely to be victimized?03/02/2014 12:18:00←03/02/2014


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UMD CCJS 100 - Crime Trends

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