UT Arlington GEOL 1301 - Final Exam Study Guide (11 pages)

Previewing pages 1, 2, 3, 4 of 11 page document View the full content.
View Full Document

Final Exam Study Guide



Previewing pages 1, 2, 3, 4 of actual document.

View the full content.
View Full Document
View Full Document

Final Exam Study Guide

278 views


Pages:
11
Type:
Study Guide
School:
University of Texas at Arlington
Course:
Geol 1301 - Earth Systems
Edition:
1

Unformatted text preview:

GEOL 1301 Fall 2014 Final Exam Study Guide October 30th November 11th CLIMATE Climate classification edit There are several ways to classify climates into similar regimes Originally climes were defined in Ancient Greece to describe the weather depending upon a location s latitude Modern climate classification methods can be broadly divided into genetic methods which focus on the causes of climate and empiric methods which focus on the effects of climate Examples of genetic classification include methods based on the relative frequency of different air mass types or locations within synoptic weather disturbances Examples of empiric classifications include climate zones defined by plant hardiness 10 evapotranspiration 11 or more generally the K ppen climate classification which was originally designed to identify the climates associated with certain biomes A common shortcoming of these classification schemes is that they produce distinct boundaries between the zones they define rather than the gradual transition of climate properties more common in nature Bergeron and Spatial Synoptic edit Main article Air mass The simplest classification is that involving air masses The Bergeron classification is the most widely accepted form of air mass classification citation needed Air mass classification involves three letters The first letter describes its moisture properties with c used for continental air masses dry and m for maritime air masses moist The second letter describes the thermal characteristic of its source region T for tropical P for polar A for Arctic or Antarctic M for monsoon E for equatorial and S for superior air dry air formed by significant downward motion in the atmosphere The third letter is used to designate the stability of the atmosphere If the air mass is colder than the ground below it it is labeled k If the air mass is warmer than the ground below it it is labeled w 12 While air mass identification was originally used in weather forecasting during



View Full Document

Access the best Study Guides, Lecture Notes and Practice Exams

Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view Final Exam Study Guide and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view Final Exam Study Guide and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?