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NOVA ITE 100 - Display Technologies

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Slide 1CRT (Cathode Ray Tube)Slide 3PDP (Plasma Display Panel)Slide 5LCD (Liquid Crystal Display)Slide 7DLP (Digital Light Processing)Slide 9Slide 10Emerging TechnologiesSlide 12SED (Surface-conduction electron-emitter display)Images borrowed from Wikipedia.CRT (Cathode Ray Tube)Pros Cons•Awesome picture, very strong colors, and black is the deepest of all competing technologies.•Extremely fluid picture.•Don’t worry about angles or lighting conditions - you can view a CRT from any degree, in any lighting condition!•A good CRT will give you about 3-5 years of eye-pleasure before the picture starts to degrade.•As Bob Barker would say, “The price is right.” ($80-$4500).•Every try lifting a refrigerator?•They become impractical above a 40-inch screen size.•It is in the midst of death because of competing (newer) technologies.•Older, curved, CRTs can pickup unnecessary reflections of light that interfere with the viewing experience, as well as a partially-hidden picture (with the bigger models) if viewed from a side-angle (it will be located on the other side of the bulge).•Possible burn-in (especially with older models).Top two images borrowed from Newegg.com, lower image borrowed from PlasmaTVScience.org.PDP (Plasma Display Panel)Pros Cons•Excellently large screen size.•Very slim – you can hang it on a wall, a ceiling, or place it on a stand!•Great color reproduction.•Nice fluid picture.•Great viewing angles.•Expensive, but prices are coming down… gradually ($1400-$12,000).•Not as lightweight as they look.•Not as durable as other technologies, it is quite fragile – a professional is recommended for any wall or ceiling hanging.•More susceptible to burn-in than other technologies.•Expect an apparent loss of picture quality with one to two years of serious use.•Cannot produce deep black levels accurately.•Quality varies too much from brand to brand.•It drains electricity like no tomorrow.Top image borrowed from SharpUSA.com, lower image borrowed from Audioholics.com.LCD (Liquid Crystal Display)Pros Cons•More screen sizes than any other competing technology!•Extremely slim – these babies can be put anywhere.•Prices are falling fast ($600-$6500).•Expect a good 5 years of serious use without an apparent loss in overall brightness – the picture doesn’t degrade, only the backlighting!•As light as a feather… metaphorically speaking.•Uses minimal electricity.•No burn-in whatsoever!•Fairly poor black levels – they are improving though.•Color reproduction is not as good as other technologies… but that is starting to change with the introduction of new technology!•Picture is not as fluid (even with the latest LCDs, “ghosting” is still an issue) as other technologies because of the way LCDs work – this is always improving though.•External light affects the brightness of the image.•Pixel failure – usually only a problem with no-name brands which have poor pixel policies (stick to name brands).Upper image borrowed from Samsung.com, lower images borrowed from Dlp.com.DLP (Digital Light Processing)Pros Cons•Excellent picture, as well as color reproduction, and the latest models have blacks that are comparable to CRTs.•Picture is as fluid as CRTs.•Virtually no maintenance - if the picture becomes darker, only the bulb needs to be replaced (more easily replaced than with LCDs)!•Lifespan is possibly longer than all other competing technologies.•The price is [just about] right ($1200-$8000).•Not very heavy, but like most rear-projection TVs, they are awkward to lift.•Absolutely, positively, no burn-in!•As with all rear-projection TVs, the viewing angle isn’t great, but it is better than all others!•In older single-chip DLPs, there is the possibility of an individual seeing the “rainbow” effect – luckily, most people will not detect it, especially with the latest DLPs (emerging technologies will remove the color wheel, or in the least, enhance it. The result? No possibility of the “rainbow” effect).•Artifacting is possible, although it is dependant on many factors.•Not as thin as other technologies but they are comparable in weight.•Color wheel noise.Upper image borrowed from Audioholics.com, lower image and description borrowed from HowStuffWorks.com.1. A digital signal causes voltages on the chip to arrange in a given configuration to form the image. 2. The light (red, green, blue) from the lamp goes through a polarizer. 3. The light bounces off the surface of the LCOS chip. 4. The reflected light goes through a second polarizer. 5. The lens collects the light that went through the second polarizer. 6. The lens magnifies and focuses the image onto the screen.LCoS (Liquid Crystal on Silicon)Pros Cons•The LCOS devices are easier to manufacture than conventional LCD displays. •They have higher resolution because several million pixels can be etched onto one chip. •They can be much smaller than conventional LCD displays. •Excellent color reproduction.•High resolutions.•No "screen door" effect.•No screen burn-in issues.•LCoS displays are currently available but they are fairly expensive and come with different names (Sony’s is known as “SXRD,” while JVC’s is known as “HD-ILA”).•Contrast isn’t quite up to snuff with the other technologies . . . yet.•Lamp life can be as short as 1000-2000 hours, or 8 to 16 months if used four hours per day.•Few models to choose from as only a few manufacturers are currently selling them.Emerging TechnologiesUpper image borrowed from Engadget.com, lower images borrowed from Canon.com..SED (Surface-conduction electron-emitter display)Pros Cons•Picture quality rivals and even exceeds all other competing technologies (this comes from people who have seen the device in motion at tradeshows).•It’s flat!•Displays aren’t available for purchase yet so any cons are hearsay at the moment – well maybe there is one con, the pricing hasn’t been


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