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MCCC PSY 210 - Chapter 6 Mood Disorders

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10/28/20091Chapter 6Mood DisordersModule ObjectivesDepressive Disorders‐ What are Mood Disorders?‐ What is Major Depressive Disorder?‐ What is Post Partum Disorder?What are Unipolar Mood Disorders?‐ What is Mania?Moods…This chapter will examine Mood Disorders. This is an entire diagnostic category that focuses on disturbances of mood.THINK on your own… What are some everyday moods people can experience?10/28/20092Mood DisordersMood disorders are a group of disorders involving severe and enduring disturbances in mood ‐ The normal functioning of mood is disrupted Spectrum of MoodThe further mood moves from base line (normal mood) the more profound the symptoms of the disorder become.What do you know about depression?True or false?Depression is not a common psychological disorder.10/28/20093What do you know about depression?True or false?Depression is not a common psychological disorder.FALSE! 18.8 million American adults (9.5 %) of the US population age 18 and older in a given year, have a depressive disorder. Depression effects men, women and children. Depression effects men, women and children. TRUE! Depression can effect anyone-but symptoms are displayed differently10/28/20094People with depression just need to get over it!People with depression just need to get over it!FALSE! Depression is an illness that effects the brain and the body“Depression is like falling into a deep, dark hole that you cannot climb out of. You scream as you fall, but it seems like no one hears you. Some days you float upward without even trying; on other days you wish that you would hit bottom so that you would never fall again.”10/28/20095Have you ever felt depressed? What does depression feel like?Stop and Think!Think about and describe the features of depression. Review the following video clip and evaluate the behaviors of the clientWhat symptoms of depression did you see? Divide these features into physical and cognitive symptoms. Major Depression10/28/20096Cognitive Symptoms of DepressionFeelings of worthlessnessLoss of interest in activities normally pleasurable ‐ Inability to experience “fun” from life (Anhedonia)Diminished ability to concentrateRecurrent thoughts of death and dyingDid you notice the client’s belief that she was the “devil?”When a person moves too far away from “normal” mood, whether too high on the spectrum or too low, they can experience psychosis. Delusions and/or hallucinations can occur which indicate a severe disturbance in cognition.Physical symptoms of DepressionNoticeable loss of energy- (fatigue)‐ Physical disturbance (vegetative symptoms)Changes in appetite and weightSleep disturbance‐ Insomnia‐ Hypersomnia10/28/20097The DSM-IV lists nine symptoms for major depression, five or more which must be present over the same two-week periodOne of the first two must be displayed‐ 1) Feeling depressed most of the day, nearly every day, or‐ 2) Markedly diminished pleasure.The other seven symptoms include: ‐ 3) Significant weight gain or loss‐ 4) Insomnia or hypersomnia‐ 5) psychomotor agitation or retardation‐ 6) Fatigue or loss of energy‐ 7) Feelings of worthlessness or inappropriate guilt‐ 8)Diminished ability to think or concentrate‐ 9) Recurrent thoughts of death, suicidal thinking, suicide attempts.Depressive DisordersDSM IV criteria indicate an extremely depressed mood state that lasts at least two weeks ‐ Social, occupational, educational or other important functioning must also be negatively impaired by the change in moodThe most easily recognized mood disorder is Major Depressive Disorder Major Depressive DisorderThis disorder is defined by the absence of manic or hypo-manic episodes and can be diagnosed as either single episode or recurrent.‐ The occurrence of just one isolated depressive episode in a lifetime is rare.‐ About 85% of single episode cases will experience a second episode and meet criteria for recurrentIf two or more major depressive episodes occur, separated by a period of two months of non-depression, then the diagnosis is recurrent.10/28/20098How long will the depression last?An important feature of major depressive episodes is that they are time limited‐ Typically lasting from 2 weeks to 9 months (untreated).Almost all depressive episodes will diminish on their own without treatment‐ However, about 10% last 2 years or longerThe average age of onset for major depressive disorder is 25-29 years.Meet ThomasWhen Thomas was 26 he began displaying mild signs of depression. Over the next 6 months his symptoms gradually worsened and Thomas stopped working or going out with friends. Thomas gained 45 pounds, was chronically unshaven and disheveled, often not bathing for a week or more. Thomas often slept for more than 20 hours a day or was awake for several days on end. Thomas became completely reclusive for the next 6-9 months and rarely left his home. A year later he bumped into some friends who were shocked to see his appearance. Thomas looked wonderful, he lost 60 pounds by riding 30 miles a day on his bike, was working a full-time job and was symptom-free of depression. Thomas’ friends were thrilled at his transformation and asked “What happened? Did you get help? Are you in therapy or taking medication?” Thomas said, “No, I just got into my own head and fixed myself.”Stop and Think!Although Thomas believes he “cured” himself, what is the most likely explanation for this mood change? Also, what is likely to happen with Thomas’ mood disorder?10/28/20099Comorbidity?Anxiety is commonly comorbid with Major Depression. ‐ About one-half of those with a primary diagnosis of major depression also have an anxiety disorder (Barbee, 1998).Anxiety and Depression go together like peanut butter and jelly!How serious is depression?Research suggests that the incidence of depression and consequent suicide seem to be steadily increasing.Approximately 750,000 people attempt suicide each year in the U.S.“Suicide is not chosen; it happenswhen pain exceeds resources for coping with pain.”10/28/200910The odds of suicide increase when depression develops at earlier ages. College students are very at risk for depression and suicide. If you or someone you know is battling with feelings of suicide please refer them to a professional.Help is always available:1-800-SUICIDETrue or False?More suicides occur during the winter and holiday seasons.True or False?More suicides occur during


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